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Annual 
Farm and 
Home 
Week 
Program 



January 15 to 19 
1934 




Program by Days 3-13 

£ rog r Wflwwnr ee • th^J 

special Conferences 27-28 

Exhibits 29-31 

FEB 28 1934 
SITV ?F 

College of Agriculture 
University of Illinois 
Urbana-Champaign 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Vol. XXXI January 9, 1934 No. 19 

Published Weekly by 

THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Entered as second-class matter December 11, 1912, at the post oflL 
at Urbana, Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Acceptance 
for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in section 
1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized July 31, 1918. 



INFORMATION FOR VISITORS 

Registration — Every visitor is urged to register im- 
mediately upon arrival. There is no registration fee. Reg- 
istration headquarters will be maintained in the University 
Auditorium during the entire week. Registration for the 
Homemakers Conference will be held in the lobby of Lin- 
coln Hall. At the time of registering you will be given an 
official Farm and Home Week badge. 

Daily Program — The daily program will consist of 
courses offered by the different departments of the College 
of Agriculture, lectures and talks by prominent speakers, 
recreational features, special exhibits, and an entertaining 
program each evening. 

Those attending will be encouraged to register for 
courses in which they are particularly interested and to 
attend them regularly thruout the week. In this way one 
will get the greatest possible benefit from the courses 
selected. 

Conference Hour — The hour 8 to 9 each morning 
has been reserved for conference with members of the 
College staff or others. Inquire at the registration desk 
for assistance in locating anyone you may wish to see. 

Locating Lecture Rooms and Laboratories — The lo- 
cation of rooms and laboratories is indicated on this pro- 
gram by room number and name of building. Signs in 
each building will direct you to the room desired. In the 
New Agricultural Building all rooms with numbers in the 
one hundreds are on the first floor, all in the two hundreds 
on the second floor, etc. 

Exhibits — Farm and Home Week guests should avail 
themselves of the opportunity of visiting the many exhibits 
on the campus pertaining to subjects of both agricultural 
and general interest. A brief description of the exhibits 
will be found at the back of this program. 

Meals — Meals may be secured at numerous restau- 
rants near the University campus. Noon lunch will be 
served at the Home Economics Cafeteria in the Woman's 
Building. Student agricultural clubs plan to serve lunches. 
Announcements will be made at Auditorium. 

Rooms — A list of rooms available in the University 
district for Farm and Home Week visitors will be main- 
tained at the registration desk in the Auditorium. 

Lost and Found — Articles lost should be reported 
and those found turned in to registration headquarters in 
the Auditorium. 

Guides — Agricultural students and faculty members 
will wear badges indicating that they are guides. Feel free 
to ask them and others on the campus for information. 

Illness and Accidents — Illness or accidents should be 
promptly reported to the registration desk in the Audi- 
torium. First aid service will be rendered by the Univer- 
sity Health Station, telephone 7-1821. 

[2] 



Program by Days 



(For Art Extgnsion ( onftrence, set r< 

(For Homtmaktrs Conference, sec fugc 26) 



MONDAY 



Monday — 9:00 a.m. 

Registration — Auditorium 

Monday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Relation of recent economic changes to 
marketing problems. Bartlett (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Recent development in tractor wheel equip- 
ment.* Shawl (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Anim. Husb. — Livestock outlook. Rusk (330 New Agr.) 
Demonstration in judging fowls for production.* Sloan 
(Stock Pavilion) 

Dairy — Plans for controlling amount of milk produced 
thru reduction in number of cows. Rhode (128 New 
Agr.) 
Problems in the direct marketing of dairy products. 
Ruehe (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Roots, root distribution, soil moisture, and ferti- 
lizers in the apple orchard. Dorsey (211 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Methods for reducing the relief load of 
the local community* Hiller (214 Nezv Agr.) 

Jr. Club Work — Teaching function of the club leader. 
Mays (South Parlor, Second Floor, W.B.) 

Home Econ. — The charm of glass. Weaver (210 W.B.) 



Monday — 2:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ. — Why some farms pay better than others. 
Mosher (127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Recent development in tractor wheel equip- 
ment.* Shawl (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Anim. Husb. — Practices and methods of successful raisers 
of beef calves in Illinois. Robbins (330 New Agr.) 
Demonstration in judging fowls for production.* Sloan 
(Stock Pavilion) 

Dairy — Shall we feed for high or for moderate produc- 
tion per cow. Nevens (128 Nezv Agr.) 
Some common flavor defects in milk. Tracy (Dairy 
Manfr.) 

Hort. — Cover crops in relation to growth maintenance in 
the apple orchard. McMunn (211 New Agr.) 
Problems in tomato growing. Weaver (123 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Methods for reducing the relief load of 
the local community.* Hiller (214 Nezv Agr.) 



*Programs designated by an asterisk are not completed in 
one hour. See preceding or following schedules for full program. 

[3] 



Home Econ. — Feeding the sick in the home. Barto (210 
W.B.) 

Monday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
Dean H. W. Mumford, presiding 

Farming on Facts and Faith. DeWitt C. Wing, Agri- 
cultural Adjustment Administration, U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (Preceded by 
violin selections, Arthur E. Cohen) 



Monday — 5:30 p.m. 

Agricultural Alumni Banquet — McKinley Foundation 
Observations. De Witt C. Wing 

Monday — 8:00 p.m. 

General Session — Men's New Gymnasium 
Athletic Evening 



TUESDAY 



Tuesday— 8:00 a.m. 

Rural Organ.— Factors favoring the development of rural 
leadership. Griffith (103 New Agr.) 



Tuesday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Rental contracts with tenants having little 
capital. Hudelson (127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin.— Plow adjustment and repair. Young (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — The land areas of Illinois. Smith (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — A square deal for the farm horse. Ed- 
monds (330 Nezv Agr.) 
Meeting the mortality problem. Card (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — The way the bee works. Milum (104 Vi- 
varium) 

Dairy — The place of purebred cattle in dairy farming. 
Yapp (128 Nezv Agr.) 
Manufacture of cottage and cream cheese.* Tuckey 
(Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Apple washing machinery. Kadow (211 New Agr.) 
The window garden. Hutchinson (123 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — An hour of music for children. Holmes 
(South Parlor, Second Floor, W.B.) 



[4] 



Tuesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Engin.- Plow attachments and equipmenl for trash 
coverage. Cleaves (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — The significance of soil types. Norton (600 Old 
Agr.) 

A mm. llrsu.- Some runout poultry problems as observed 
in Illinois. Alp (316 New Agr.) 
What the federal corn-hog production control program 
means to Illinois swine growers. Carroll (330 Nezv 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Types of bee equipment. Milum (104 Vi- 
varium) 

Dairy — Fundamental principles in dairy cattle breeding. 
Kuhlman (128 New Agr.) 
Manufacture of cottage and cream cheese.* Tuckey 
(Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Experiments in removal of spray residue on apples. 
Ruth (211 New Agr.) 
Small scale commercial canning. Huelsen (123 New 
Agr.) 

Home Econ. — Cutlery with an edge. Dorsey (210 W.B.) 

Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders — Annual meeting (205 
Old Agr.) 

Illinois Farm Managers' Association — Annual meeting 
(Newman Foundation) 

Tuesday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

E. W. Lehmann, presiding 

Needed reforms to reduce the cost of town and county 
government. M. H. Hunter, University of Illinois, 
Professor of Economics. (Preceded by selections, 
Men's Glee Club, University of Illinois. R. F. Dvorak, 
Director) 

Tuesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. & Dairy — Store sales as related to per capita 
consumption of milk.* Bartlett. Round table discus- 
sion (103 New Agr.) 
Livestock marketing problems of today.* Ashby. Round 
table discussion (215 Com.) 

Agr. Engin. — Binder troubles and adjustments. Shawl 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Productivity levels of Illinois soils. Bauer (600 
Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — The development of young stallions. Potts 
(330 New Agr.) 
Egg candling and grading demonstration.* Alp (331 
New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Bee life is short; facts worth knowing. 
Milum (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Preparation of cultured and flavored milk drinks; 
manufacture of honey-cream.* Tracy (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Apple scab. Anderson (211 New Agr.) 
[5] 



Rural Organ. — What responsibility cooperation with the 
federal program for relief entails on the part of the 
local community.* Hiller (214 New Agr.) 

Jr. Club Work — Preparing for group discussions. Mays 
(South Parlor, Second Floor, IV. B.) 

Home Econ. — Homemaking and your university. Wood- 
ruff (210 W.B.) 



Tuesday— 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. & Dairy — Store sales as related to per capita 
consumption of milk.* Bartlett. Round table discus- 
sion (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Econ. & Hort. — Marketing vegetables thru roadside 
stands. Lloyd (123 New Agr.) 

Agr. Econ. — Livestock marketing problems of today.* 
Ashby. Round table discussion (215 Com.) 
Adjusting leases to price changes and production ad- 
justments. Mosher (127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Mower troubles and adjustments. Shawl 
(201 Agr. Eng.) 

Agron. — Agronomic adjustments in Illinois. Burlison 
(600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — The importance of pastures in the economi- 
cal maintenance of beef breeding herds. Rusk (330 
New Agr.) 

Egg candling and grading demonstration.* Alp (331 
New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Removal and care of the honey crop with 
extracting demonstration. Milum (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Figuring low-cost rations for milk production. 
Nevens (128 New Agr.) 
Preparation of cultured and flavored milk drinks ; manu- 
facture of honey-cream* Tracy (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Newer sulfur fungicides for disease control on 
apples. Anderson (211 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — What responsibility cooperation with the 
federal program for relief entails on the part of the 
local community.* Hiller (214 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — Smartly fitted garments. Eades and Whit- 
lock (210 W.B.) 



Tuesday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
R. R. Hudelson, presiding 

The experience of France with inflation. Dr. Max J. 

Wasserman, University of Illinois Assistant Profes- 
sor of Economics (Preceded by vocal solos, Bruce 
R. Foote, baritone) 

Tuesday — 5:15 p.m. 

Stockman's Banquet — Newman Hall 
The horse and mule supply. Wayne Dinsmore 

[6] 



Tuesday — 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

k. ]•'. llii row Mrs, presiding 

An hour in a sculptor's studio. Lecture and demon- 
stration. Lor ado Taft, Nonresident Professor of 
Art of the University of Illinois. 



WEDNESDAY 



Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. 

Rural Organ. — Meeting the problem of deficient leader- 
ship. Griffith (103 New Agr.) 

Wednesday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Farm debt conciliation and refinancing. Case 
(Auditorium) 
Cost of producing corn, wheat, and other crops. Ross 
(127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Temporary farm buildings. Lehmann (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Choosing a legume for the contracted acres.* 
Linsley (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Homemade beef and lamb.* Bull (Meat 
Lab., Old Agr.) 
Making the most of home-grown feeds in fattening 

cattle for market. Snapp (330 New Agr.) 
Corn-belt feeds for corn-belt hens. Sloan (316 Nezv 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Why, how, when, and with what shall we 
requeen? Milum (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Inexpensive steps in producing milk and cream of 
high quality* Prucha (Stock Pavilion) 
Cheddar cheese making* Tuckey (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Forming the framework of the apple tree. Kelley 
(211 New Agr.) 
The farmer's lily pool. Dorner (123 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — The relation of rural recreation to the 
church program* Rohrbough (214 New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — Contribution of home economics to art ex- 
tension. Bevier. The charm of glass.* Weaver. (South 
Parlor, Second Floor, W.B.) 



Wednesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — What is happening to farm mortgage indebt- 
edness in Illinois? Hopkins. (Auditorium) 

Agr. Engin. — Repair and maintenance of farm buildings. 
Foster (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Choosing a legume for the contracted acres.* 
Linsley (600 Old Agr.) 

[7] 



A mm. Husb. — Homemade beef and lamb* Bull (Meat 
1Mb., Old Agr.) 
Managing laying flocks that are kept indoors. Philips 

(316 New Agr.) 
Can hogs be used to reduce the oats surplus on Illinois 
farms? Carroll (330 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Fall and winter management of bees. Da- 
dant (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Inexpensive steps in producing milk and cream 
of high quality.* Prucha (Stock Pavilion) 
Cheddar cheese making* Tuckey (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — The effect of pruning upon apple trees coming 
into bearing. Kelley (211 Nezv Agr.) 
How a vegetable plant doctor works. Kadow (123 New 
Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — The relation of rural recreation to the 
church program* Rohrbough (214 New Agr.) 

Illinois Jersey Cattle Club — Annual meeting. (205 Old 
Agr.) 

Art Exten. — The charm of glass.* Weaver. Color and 
design in home furnishings. Hitchcock (South Parlor, 
Second Floor, W.B.) 

Wednesday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
Dean H. W. Mumford, presiding 

The Farm Credit Administration and Illinois Agricul- 
ture. Wood Netherland, General Agent, Farm 
Credit Administration, St. Louis (Preceded by group 
singing led by E. I. Pilchard) 

Wednesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — How to improve the demand for apples. 
Lloyd (326 New Agr.) 
Production credit problems and procedures. Norton. 
Potential use of cooperative banks by Illinois as- 
sociations.* Cosgrove, chairman, round table. Mar- 
chant, James, Fahrnkopf (Auditorium) 

Agr. Engin. — Plumbing and sewage disposal. Lehmann 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Ac.ron. — Problems of reduced and contracted acres. 
Hackleman (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — The utilization of pasture crops in growing 
and fattening beef cattle. Rusk (330 New Agr.) 
Controlling poultry lice and mites. Flint (316 New Agr.) 

Bf.kkeeping — Production of comb, bulk comb, and cut 
comb honey. Farrar (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Dairy codes and their influence in raising farm 
dairy prices. Bartlett (128 New Agr.) 
Cheddar cheese making.* Tuckey (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Controlling codling moth at the lowest cost. Flint 
(211 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. & Art Exten. — New conceptions of land- 
scape planning. Lohmann (103 New Agr.) 

Jr. Club Work — Conducting group discussions. Mays 
(South Parlor, Second Floor, W.B.) 

[8] 



Forestry Tree crops for contracted acreage. 41 Sawyer 
(307 New Agr.) 

Wednesday — 2:00 p.m. 

\»;k. Fcon. — Potential use of cooperative banks by Illinois 

associations.* CoSGROVE, chairman, round table. M UR 
chant. jAMESj PAHRNK0PF {Auditorium) 
Cost of producing livestock products. Wilcox (127 Nezv 
Agr.) 

AGR. Engin. — Lighting and heating for the home. Foster 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Stopping disastrous soil erosion. UHLAND (600 
Old Agr.) 

A mm. Husb. — Methods of managing and feeding home- 
bred calves. Snapp (330 New Agr.) 
Recent findings in poultry research. Card (316 Nezv 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Swarm control in extracted honey produc- 
tion. Dadant (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Utilizing home-grown feeds for milk production. 
Nevens (128 Nezv Agr.) 
Cheddar cheese making.* Tuckey (Dairy Man jr.) 

Hort. — Effect of oil spray on apple foliage. Farrar (211 
Nezv Agr.) 
When to plant vegetable crops for profit. McCollum 
(123 Nezv Agr.) 

Rural Organ. & Art Ext. — Landscape architecture and 
outdoor recreation. Schaffer (103 Nezv Agr.) 

Forestry — Tree crops for contracted acreage.* Sawyer 
(307 Nezv Agr.) 

Wednesday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

Ruth A. Wardall, presiding 

Buying standards for consumers. Ruth O'Brien, Chief, 
Division of Textiles and Clothing, Bureau of Home 
Economics, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D.C. (Preceded by cello selections, Mrs. 
Margaret Sullivan) 

Wednesday — 4:00 p.m. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association — Annual meet- 
ing. (205 Old Agr.) 

Art. Exten. — Concert. University of Illinois Orchestra, 
F. B. Stiven, Director (Smith Memorial Hall) 

Wednesday — 5:30 p.m. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association Banquet. (Han- 
ley's) 

Wednesday — 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Men's New Gymnasium 
R. R. Hudelson, presiding 

Winter Festival — Directed by Lynn T. Rohrbough, Di- 
rector Church Recreation League of Ohio 

[9] 



THURSDAY 



Thursday — 8:00 a.m. 

Rural Organ. — The relation of the leader to the activity. 
Griffith 

Music and Drama — Rehearsal for winning play groups. 
{Auditorium) 

Thursday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Productive value of Illinois farm land based 
on records of earnings. Case {Auditorium) 
Horse, tractor, and truck costs. Wills {127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Kind of weeds, legal status, their character- 
istics and location by areas. Wilson {201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Using legumes efficiently on contracted acres. 
Sears {600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Homemade pork* Bull {Meat Lab., Old 
Agr.) 
Feeding western lambs. Kammlade {330 New Agr.) 
The cost of producing eggs and pullets in 1933. Wright 
{316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Beeswax — what shall we do with it? Dadant. 
The value of beekeeping organizations. Peterson {104 
Vivarium) 

Dairy — The place of the pedigree in dairy cattle selection. 
Rhode {128 New Agr.) 
Buttermaking* Ruehe {Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Fruit bud formation on the apple, pollen, pollina- 
tion, fruit setting, sterile varieties and thinning.* 
Dorsey and McMunn {211 New Agr.) 
Some of the more popular garden flowers. Hall {123 
New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — Gardens of yesterday and today. Peterson 
Modern garden design .* White {103 New Agr.) 

Music and Drama — Annual meeting of the state represen- 
tatives.* Prather {214 Neiv Agr.) 

Thursday— 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Normal value as an objective in land ap- 
praisal. Hay {Auditorium) 

Agr. Engin. — Seed cleaning and seed cleaning machinery. 
Lehmann and others {201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Starting legumes on contracted acres. Dungan 

{600 Old Agr.) 
Anim. Husb. — Homemade pork* Bull {Meat Lab., Old 
Agr.) 
Why some poultry flocks don't pay. Halpin {316 New 

Agr.) 
A pasture system that markets spring pigs in July. 
Carroll {330 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — How shall we market our honey crop? Duax 

( 104 Vivarium) 
Dairy — The value of bull indexes in sire testing. Yapp 

{128 New Agr.) 
Buttermaking* Ruehe {Dairy Manfr.) 

[10] 



Hort. — Fruit bud formation on the apple, pollen, pollina 
tion, fruit setting, sterile varieties and thinning.* 

DORSEY and McMUNN (211 New Agr.) 

The value of irrigation for vegetables. SOMERS ( 123 
New Agr.) 

Illinois Guernsey Breeders Association- Annual meet 
ing (205 Old Agr.) 

ART. Exten. — Modern garden design/* 1 WHITE. Planting 
design in relation to structure. Robinson (103 New 

- igr.) 

Music & Drama — Annual meeting of the state representa- 
tives* Prather (214 Neiv Agr.) 

Thursday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
W. L. Burlison, presiding 

European trade barriers in relation to Illinois agricul- 
ture. Dr. C. L. Stewart, Chief, Land Economics, 
College of Agriculture, University of Illinois (Pre- 
ceded by selections, University String Trio, Mr. Cohen, 
Airs. Sullivan, Miss Watt) 



Thursday — 1:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ. & An. Husb. — How current economic condi- 
tions affect the poultry outlook for 1934. Johnston 
(316 New Agr.) 

Agr. Econ. — Relative importance placed upon soil, build- 
ings, location, and other factors by western European 
appraisers. Stewart. Relative importance placed 
upon soil, buildings, location, and other factors by 
American appraisers. AIorse (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Weed control by mechanical methods.* Hay 
and others (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Starting pastures on contracted acres. Pieper 
(600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Maintaining the health of the breeding 
herd. Barger (Anim. Path.) 

Beekeeping — The nature of brood diseases of bees and 
their identification. Milum (104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Benefits to the herd owner in freeing his herd 
from infectious abortion and mastitis. Graham 
(Anim. Path.) 
Buttermaking.* Ruehe (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Stationary spray plant outlays.* Reed (211 New 
Agr.) 
Bring in your vegetable garden problems. Members of 
staff (123 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Methods of handling rural recreation in 
the church program to meet community needs.* Rohr- 
bough (214 New Agr.) 

Jr. Club Work — Self-development for leadership. Mays 
(South Parlor, Second Floor, IV. B.) 

Forestry — Controlling erosion with trees.* Sawyer 

Art. Exten. — Illinois pioneer architecture. Reed (120 
Arch.) 

Music & Drama — Annual state rural music tournament.* 
(Auditorium) 

[11] 



Thursday — 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Life insurance companies and the farm 
mortgage field. Westbrook. Round table discussion 
{103 New Agr.) 
Effect of A.A.A. program on labor, power, and machin- 
ery costs. Johnston {127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Weed control by mechanical methods.* Hay 
and others {201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Controlling weeds on contracted acres. Hackle- 
man. Effect of reduced acres of corn on insect 
damage. Bigger {600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — My method of feeding cattle. Clark, 
Bruder, and Griffith {330 New Agr.) 
Changing practices in poultry husbandry. Halpin {316 
Nezv Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Apiary inspection and treatment of brood 
diseases of bees. Duax {104 Vivarium) 

Dairy — Current problems in feeding dairy cattle. Nevens 
{Anim. Path.) 
Buttermaking* Ruehe {Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Stationary spray plant outlays* Reed {211 New 
Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Methods of handling rural recreation in 
the church program.* Rohrbough {214 New Agr.) 

Forestry — Controlling erosion with trees * Sawyer {307 
New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — The architecture of old Kentucky. Newcomb 
{120 Arch.) 

Music & Drama — Annual state rural music tournament.* 
{Auditorium) 

Thursday— 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
J. C. Blair, presiding 
The outlook for farming from the farm boy's stand- 
point. Liberty Hyde Bailey, author and horticul- 
turist. (Preceded by vocal solos, LeRoy Hamp, tenor) 

Thursday — 4:00 p.m. 

Agr. Engin. — Demonstration of seed cleaning machinery.* 
{201 Agr. Engin.) 

Music & Drama — Rehearsals of music groups for partici- 
pation in the annual rural music festival. {Smith Me- 
morial Hall) 
Rehearsal for play groups. {Auditorium) 

Thursday — 6:00 p.m. 

Annual dinner of participants in the 1933-34 Music and 
Drama Tournament {Cafeteria, Woman's Building) 

Thursday— 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
D. E. Lindstrom, presiding 
State music and drama tournament 
An admission fee of 25 cents will be charged for the tour- 
nament. The proceeds will be used to help pay the 
expenses of the participating groups. 

[12] 



FRIDAY 



Friday — 8:00 a.m. 

Rural Organ. — Measuring the results of leadership. 
Griffith (103 New Agr.) 



Friday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Effect of A. A. A. program on rotations and 
livestock production on individual farms. Johnston 
(127 Neiv Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Demonstration of seed cleaning machinery.* 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — 1934 may be our worst chinch bug year. Flint 
(600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Respiratory diseases in feeding cattle. 
Thorp (330 New Agr.) 
Poultry clinic* Torrey (Anim. Path.) 

Dairy — Systems of breeding which have proved success- 
ful.* Yapp (Stock Pavilion) 
Cream whipping. Ramsey (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Cutting costs in apple production * Dorsey, Marsh, 
and McMunn (211 Nezv Agr.) 
Some of the better flowering shrubs and vines. Dorner 
(123 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — New facts about milk. Outhouse (210 
W.B). 

Friday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Engin. — Demonstration of seed cleaning machinery.* 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — The outlook for insects in 1934. Flint. Reduc- 
ing the crop disease tax for 1934. Koehler (600 Old 
Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Poultry clinic* Torrey (Anim. Path.) 
Would it be profitable for you to change the type of 
hogs you raise? Carroll (Stock Pavilion) 

Dairy — Systems of breeding which have proved success- 
ful* Yapp (Stock Pavilion) 
Making of ice cream and fancy ice cream demonstration. 
Tracy (Dairy Manfr.) 

Hort. — Cutting costs in apple production.* Dorsey, Marsh, 
and McMunn (211 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — Taking time to save time. Ward (210 W.B.) 

Friday— 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
H. P. Rusk, presiding 

Progress in the corn-hog campaign. Claude R. Wickard, 
Assistant Chief, Corn-Hog Section, A. A. A. (Preceded 
by selections by the Agricultural Quartet) 



[13] 



Program by Courses 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Agricultural Marketing 

(103 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Relation of recent economic changes to 
marketing problems. R. W. Bartlett 

Tuesday 

1:00- 2:50 Store sales as related to per capita consump- 
tion of milk. R. W. Bartlett. Round table 
discussion 

1:00- 2:50 Livestock marketing problems of today. R. 
C. Ashby. Round table discussion (215 
Commerce) 

2:00- 2:50 Marketing vegetables thru roadside stands. J. 
W. Lloyd (123 New Agriculture) 

Wednesday 

1:00- 1:50 How to improve the demand for apples. J. 
W. Lloyd (326 New Agriculture) 

Thursday 

1:00- 1:50 How current economic conditions affect the 
poultry outlook for 1934. P. E. Johnston 
(316 New Agriculture) 



Farm Credit Problems 

(Auditorium) 

Wednesday 

L. J. Norton, presiding 

9:00- 9:50 Farm debt conciliation and refinancing. H. 
C. M. Case 

10:00-10:50 What is happening to farm mortgage indebt- 
edness in Illinois? C. E. Hopkins, Director, 
Farm Credit Administration. St. Louis, 
Missouri 

1:00-2:50 Production credit problems and procedures. 
L. J. Norton 
Potential use of cooperative banks by Illinois 
associations. Round table chairman, J. R. 
Cosgrove, Acting President of the St. Louis 
Bank for Cooperatives, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Discussions by L. R. Marchant, Illinois 
Farm Supply Company, Chicago; C. H. 
James, Southern Illinois Seed Growers Ex- 
change, Flora; Harrison Fahrnkopf, Illi- 
nois Grain Corporation, Chicago 

[14] 



Farm Land Economic Problems 
(Auditorium) 



Thursday 
W. W. McLaughlin, Director of State De- 
partment of Agriculture, presiding 

9:00- 9:50 Productive value of Illinois farm land based 
on records of earnings. H. C. M. Case 

10:00-10:50 Normal value as an objective in land ap- 
praisal. C. E. Hay, Supervising Appraiser 
for Northern Illinois, Federal Land Bank 
of St. Louis 

D. H. Doane, presiding 

1:00- 1:50 Relative importance placed upon soil, build- 
ings, location, and other factors by western 
European appraisers. C. L. Stewart 
Relative importance placed upon soil, build- 
ings, location and other factors by Ameri- 
can appraisers. T. D. Morse, Doane Agri- 
cultural Service, St. Louis (103 Neiv Agr.) 

2:00- 2:50 Life insurance companies and the farm 
mortgage field. S. F. Westbrook, Aetna 
Life Insurance Company, Hartford, Con- 
necticut. Round table discussion (103 Nezv 
Agr.) 



Farm Management Problems in the 
Light of the A.A.A. Program 

(127 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

2:00- 2:50 Why some farms pay better than others. M. 
L. Mosher 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Rental contracts with tenants having little 
capital. R. R. Hudelson 

2:00- 2:50 Adjusting leases to price changes and produc- 
tion adjustments. M. L. Mosher 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Cost of producing corn, wheat, and other 
crops. R. C. Ross 

2:00- 2:50 Cost of producing livestock products. R. H. 
Wilcox 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Horse, tractor, and truck costs. J. E. Wills 

2:00- 2:50 Effect of A.A.A. program on labor, power, 
and machinery costs. P. E. Johnston 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Effect of A.A.A. program on rotations and 
livestock production on individual farms. 
P. E. Johnston 

[15] 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Machinery Maintenance and 
Adjustment 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 



Monday 

1:00- 2:50 Recent development in tractor wheel equip- 
ment. R. I. Shawl x 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Plow adjustment and repair. A. L. Young 

10:00-10:50 Plow attachments and equipment for trash 
coverage. Thayer Cleaver, Junior Agri- 
cultural Engineer, U.S.D.A., Urbana 

1:00- 1:50 Binder troubles and adjustments. R. I. Shawl 

2:00- 2:50 Mower troubles and adjustments. R. I. Shawl 



Building and Equipment Maintenance 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Temporary farm buildings. E. W. Lehmann 

10:00-10:50 Repair and maintenance of farm buildings. 
W. A. Foster 

1:00- 1:50 Plumbing and sewage disposal. E. W. Leh- 
mann 

2:00- 2:50 Lighting and heating for the home. W. A. 
Foster 



Weed Control and Seed Cleaning 
Machinery 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Kind of weeds, legal status, their characteris- 
tics and location by areas. A. C. Wilson, 
Chief Seed Analyst, State Department of 
Agriculture, Springfield 

10:00-10:50 Seed cleaning and seed cleaning machinery. 
E. W. Lehmann and others 

1:00- 2:50 Weed control by mechanical methods. R. C. 
Hay and others 

4:00- 6:00 Demonstration of seed cleaning machinery 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstration of seed cleaning machinery 
(continued) 



[16] 



AGRONOMY 



Some Factors Affecting Agricultural 
Adjustment 
(600 Old A gr.) 



Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 The land areas of Illinois. R. S. Smith 

10:00-10:50 The significance of soil types. E. A. Norton 

1:00- 1:50 Productivity levels of Illinois soils. F. C. 
Bauer 

2:00- 2:50 Agronomic adjustments in Illinois. W. L. 
Burlison 



Making the Best Use of the 
Contracted Acres 

(600 Old Agr.) 



Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Choosing a legume for the contracted acres. 
C. M. Linsley 

1:00- 1:50 Problems of reduced and contracted acres. 
J. C. Hacklemann 

2:00- 2:50 Stopping disastrous soil erosion. R. E. 
Uhland, Regional Director, Soil Erosion 
Service, Bethany, Missouri 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Using legumes efficiently on contracted acres. 
O. H. Sears 

10:00-10:50 Starting legumes on contracted acres. G. H. 

DUNGAN 

1:00- 1:50 Starting pastures on contracted acres. J. J. 
Pieper 

2:00- 2:50 Controlling weeds on contracted acres. J. C. 
Hackleman 
Effect of reduced acres of corn on insect 
damage. J. H. Bigger 



Insect and Disease Problems for 1934 

(600 Old Agr.) 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 1934 may be our worst chinch bug year. W. 
P. Flint 

10:00-10:50 The outlook for insects in 1934. W. P. Flint 
Reducing the crop disease tax for 1934. Ben- 
jamin Koehler 



171 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Beef Cattle Feeding 

(330 New Agriculture) 



Monday 

2:00- 2:50 Practices and methods of successful raisers of 
beef calves in Illinois. E. T. Robbins 

Tuesday 

2:00- 2:50 The importance of pastures in the economical 
maintenance of beef breeding herds. H. P. 
Rusk 

Wednesday 

2:00- 2:50 Methods of managing and feeding home- 
bred calves. R. R. Snapp 

Thursday 

2:00- 2:50 My method of feeding cattle. Loren Clark, 
Elmer Bruder, Burdette Griffith 



Farm Butchering, Cutting and 
Curing of Meat 

(Meat Laboratory, Old Agriculture) 

Wednesday 
9:00-10:50 Homemade beef and lamb. Sleeter Bull 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Homemade pork. Sleeter Bull 



Livestock Management 

(330 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Livestock outlook. H. P. Rusk 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 A square deal for the farm horse. J. L. Ed- 
monds 

1:00-1:50 The development of young stallions. George 
Potts 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Making the most of home-grown feeds in fat- 
tening cattle for market. R. R. Snapp 

1:00- 1:50 The utilization of pasture crops in growing 
and fattening beef cattle. H. P. Rusk 

Thursday 
9:00- 9:50 Feeding western lambs. W. G. Kammlade 

[18] 



1:00- 1:50 Maintaining the health of the breeding herd. 
E. II. Barger (Animal Pathology) 

Friday 
( ):00- 9:50 Respiratory diseases in feeding rattle. Frank 
Thorp, Jr. 



Poultry Management 

(316 Nezv Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 2:50 Demonstration in judging fowls for produc- 
tion. H. J. Sloan (Stock Pavilion) 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Meeting the mortality problem. L. E. Card 

10:00-10:50 Some current poultry problems as observed in 
Illinois. H. H. Alp 

1:00- 2:50 Egg candling and grading demonstration. H. 
H. Alp (331 New Agriculture) 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Corn-belt feeds for corn-belt hens. H. J. 
Sloan 

10:00-10:50 Managing laying flocks that are kept indoors. 
A. G. Philips, Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago 

1:00- 1:50 Controlling poultry lice and mites. W. P. 
Flint 

2:00- 2:50 Recent findings in poultry research. L. E. 
Card 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 The cost of producing eggs and pullets in 
1933. L. Wright 

10:00-10:50 Why some poultry flocks don't pay. J. G. 
Halpin, Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 
University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wiscon- 
sin 

1:00- 1:50 How present economic conditions affect the 
poultry outlook for 1934. P. E. Johnston 

2:00- 2:50 Changing practices in poultry husbandry. J. 
G. Halpin 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Poultry clinic. J. P. Torrey (Animal Path- 
ology) 



Swine Feeding and Management 

(330 New Agriculture) 



Tuesday 

10:00-10:50 What the federal corn-hog production control 
program means to Illinois swine growers. 
W. E. Carroll 

Wednesday 

10:00-10:50 Can hogs be used to reduce the oats surplus 
on Illinois farms? W. E. Carroll 

[19] 



Thursday 

10:00-10:50 A pasture system that markets spring pigs in 
July. W. E. Carroll 

Friday 

10:00-10:50 Would it be profitable for you to change the 
type of hogs you raise? Judging demonstra- 
tion. W. E. Carroll (Stock Pavilion) 



Beekeeping 

(104 Vivarium) 

Tuesday 

9:00-9:50 The way the bee works. V. G. Milum 
10:00-10:50 Types of bee equipment. V. G. Milum 

1:00- 1:50 Bee life is short; facts worth knowing. V. G. 
Milum 

2:00- 2:50 Removal and care of the honey crop with ex- 
tracting demonstrations. V. G. Milum 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Why, how, when, and with what shall we re- 
queen? V. G. Milum 

10:00-10:50 Fall and winter management of bees. M. G. 
Dadant, American Bee Journal, Hamilton, 
Illinois 

1:00- 1:50 Production of comb, bulk comb, and cut comb 
honey. M. D. Farrar 

2:00- 2:50 Swarm control in extracted honey production. 
M. G. Dadant 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Beeswax— what shall we do with it? M. G. 
Dadant 
The value of beekeeping organizations. E. F. 
Peterson, Secretary, Illinois State Beekeep- 
ers Association, Kewanee 

10:00-10:50 How shall we market our honey crop? C. L. 
Duax, Chief Inspector of Apiaries, State 
Department of Agriculture, Chicago 

1:00- 1:50 The nature of brood diseases of bees and 
their identification. V. G. Milum 

2:00- 2:50 Apiary inspection and treatment of brood dis- 
eases of bees. C. L. Duax 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Current Dairy Problems 

(128 New Agriculture) 



Monday 

:00- 1:50 Plans for controlling amount of milk pro- 
duced thru reduction in number of cows. 
C. S. Rhode 

[20] 






Tuesday 
1:00- 1:50 Store sales as related to per capita consump 
tion o\ milk. R. \V. Barh ett I 103 New 
. igriculture) 

Wednesday 
1:00- 1:50 Hairy codes and their influence in raising 
farm dairy prices. R, \V. BARTLETT 

Thursday 
1 :00- 1:50 Benefits to the herd owner in freeing his herd 
from infections abortion and mastitis. Rob- 
ert Graham (Animal Pathology) 



Dairy Cattle Breeding and 
Management 

(128 Nezo Agriculture) 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 The place of purebred cattle in dairy farming. 
W. W. Yapp 

10:00-10:50 Fundamental principles in dairy cattle breed- 
ing. A. F. Kuhlman 

Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstration: Inexpensive steps in pro- 
ducing milk and cream of high quality. M. 
J. Prucha (Stock Pavilion) 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 The place of the pedigree in dairy cattle selec- 
tion. C. S. Rhode 

10:00-10:50 The value of bull indexes in sire testing. W. 
W. Yapp 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstration: Systems of breeding which 
have proved successful. W. W. Yapp (Stock 
Pavilion) 



Dairy Cattle Feeding 

(128 New Agriculture) 






Monday 

2:00- 2:50 Shall we feed for high or for moderate pro- 
duction per cow. W. B. Nevens 

Tuesday 

2:00- 2:50 Figuring low-cost rations for milk production. 
W. B. Nevens 

Wednesday 

2:00- 2:50 Utilizing home-grown feeds for milk produc- 
tion. W. B. Nevens 

Thursday 

2:00-2:50 Current problems in feeding dairy cattle: feed- 
ing mineral supplements ; grinding feeds ; 
making good quality silage ; new feeds ; etc. 
W. B. Nevens (Animal Pathology) 

[21] 



Dairy Products 

(Dairy Manufactures) 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Problems in the direct marketing of dairy 
products. H. A. Ruehe 

2:00- 2:50 Some common flavor defects in milk. P. H. 
Tracy 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Manufacture of cottage and cream cheese: 
lecture and demonstration. S. L. Tuckey 

1:00-2:50 Preparation of cultured and flavored milk 
drinks ; manufacture of honey-cream. Lec- 
ture and demonstration. P. H. Tracy 

Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Cheddar cheese making. Lecture and demon- 
stration. S. L. Tuckey 

1:00- 2:50 Cheddar cheese making (continued). S. L. 
Tuckey 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Buttermaking. Lecture and demonstration. H. 
A. Ruehe 

1:00- 2:50 Buttermaking (continued). H. A. Ruehe 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Cream whipping. R. J. Ramsey 

10:00-10:50 Making of ice cream and fancy ice cream 
demonstration. P. H. Tracy 



HORTICULTURE 

Apple Production 

(211 New Agriculture) 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Roots, root distribution, soil moisture, and 
fertilizers in the apple orchard. M. J. 
Dorsey 

2:00- 2:50 Cover crops in relation to growth maintenance 
in the apple orchard. R. L. McMunn 

Tuesday 

9.00- 9:50 Apple washing machinery. K. J. Kadow 

10:00-10:50 Experiments in removal of spray residue on 
apples. W. A. Ruth 

1:00- 1:50 Apple scab. H. W. Anderson 

2:00- 2:50 Newer sulfur fungicides for disease control 
on apples. H. W. Anderson 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Forming the framework of the apple tree. 
V. W. Kelley 

[22] 



10:00 10:50 The effect of pruning upon apple trees com- 
ing into bearing. V. W. KEU i -y 

1:00- 1:50 Controlling codling moth at the lowest cost. 
W. P. Fl.INT 

2:00- 2:50 Effect of oil spray on apple foliage. M. D. 
Farrak 

Thursday 
0:00-10:50 Fruit bud formation on the apple, pollen, 
pollination, fruit setting, sterile varieties 
and thinning. M. J. Dorsey and R. L. Mc- 
Munn 

1:00-2:50 Stationary spray plant outlays. R. H. Reed 

Friday 
9:00-10:50 Cutting costs in apple production. M. J. 
Dorsey, R. S. Marsh, and R. L. McMunn 



Flowers for the Farm Home 

(123 New Agriculture) 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 The window garden. James Hutchinson 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 The farmer's lily pool. H. B. Dorner 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Some of the more popular garden flowers. 
S. W. Hall 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Some of the better flowering shrubs and vines. 
H. B. Dorner 



The Home Vegetable Garden 

(123 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

2:00- 2:50 Problems in tomato growing. B. L. Weaver 

Tuesday 
10:00-10:50 Small scale commercial canning. W. A. Huel- 

sen 

2:00- 2:50 Marketing vegetables thru roadside stands. 
J. W. Lloyd 

Wednesday 
10:00-10:50 How a vegetable plant doctor works. K. J. 
Kadow 

2:00- 2:50 When to plant vegetable crops for profit. J. 
P. McCollum 

Thursday 

10:00-10:50 The value of irrigation for vegetables. L. A. 
Somers 

1:00- 1:50 Bring in your vegetable garden problems. 
Members of staff 



[23] 



RURAL ORGANIZATION, 

JUNIOR CLUB WORK 

AND FORESTRY 

Administration of Rural Relief 

(214 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 2:50 Methods for reducing the relief load of the 
local community. E. T. Hiller 

Tuesday 

1 : 00- 2 : 50 What responsibility cooperation with the 
federal program for relief entails on the 
part of the local community. E. T. Hiller 



Building a Constructive Rural 
Church Program 

(214 Neiv Agriculture) 

Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 The relation of rural recreation to the church 
program. Lynn T. Rohrbough, Church 
Recreation Service of Ohio, Delaware, Ohio 

1 : 00- 1 : 50 New conceptions of landscape planning. K. 
B. Lohmann (103 New Agriculture) 

2:00- 2:50 Landscape architecture and outdoor recrea- 
tion. O. G. Schaffer (103 New Agricul- 
ture) 

Thursday 

1:00- 2:50 Alethods of handling rural recreation in the 
church program to meet community needs. 
Lynn T. Rohrbough 



Problems Confronting Com- 
munity Leaders 

(103 New Agriculture) 

Tuesday 

8:00- 8:50 Factors favoring the development of rural 
leadership. C. R. Griffith 

Wednesday 

8:00- 8:50 Meeting the problem of deficient leadership. 
C. R. Griffith 

Thursday 

8:00- 8:50 The relation of the leader to the activity. C. 
R. Griffith 

Friday 

8:00- 8:50 Measuring the results of leadership. C. R. 
Griffith 



[24] 



Working With Young People 

(South Parlor, Second Ploor, Woman's Building) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Teaching function of the club leader. A. B. 

Mays 

Tuesday 
1:00- 1:50 Preparing for group discussions. A. B. Mays 

Wednesday 

1:00- 1:50 Conducting group discussions. A. B. Mays 

Thursday 

1:00- 1:50 Self-development for leadership. A. B. Mays 



Farm Forestry 

(307 New Agriculture) 

Wednesday 

1:00- 2:50 Tree crops for contracted acreage. L. E. 
Sawyer 

Thursday 
1:00- 2:50 Controlling erosion with trees. L. E. Sawyer 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Helps for Homemakers 

(210 Woman's Building) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 The charm of glass. Virginia H. Weaver 

2:00- 2:50 Feeding the sick in the home. Harriet T. 
Barto 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 An hour of music for children. Ralph M. 
Holmes {South Parlor, Second Floor, 
Woman's Building) 

10:00-10:50 Cutlery with an edge. Mrs. Jean M. Dorsey, 
Urbana 

1:00- 1:50 Homemaking and your university. Sybil 
Woodruff 

2:00- 2:50 Smartly fitted garments. Helen Eades and 
Mary C. Whitlock 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 New facts about milk. Julia Outhouse 
10:00-10:50 Taking time to save time. Gladys J. Ward 



[25 



Homemakers Conference 

(Lincoln Hall Theatre) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Conference of home bureau officers 

Organization, are we building for the future? 

Coles Mrs. Arla Cuppy 

Macoupin Mrs. W. A. Weller 

Mason Mrs. J. W. McHarry 

McHenry Mrs. Dan Desmond 

Vermilion Mrs. Edna Jenkins 

Woodford Mrs. P. F. Streid 

The homemaker's responsibility toward legis- 
lation. Mrs. Homer Johnson, McLean 
County 

1:30 p.m. Business session, Illinois Federation of Home 
Bureaus. Mrs. Elsie Mies, President 

Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Group singing led by Mrs. Annetta Rich, 

McDonough County 
Roll call by counties 
Some organizers of other days. Dr. Louise 

Dunbar 
Brief reports of outstanding county activities 
1:30- 2:50 Section round tables 

Child development. Edna E. Walls (106 

Lincoln Hall) 
Health. Fannie M. Brooks (Lincoln Hall 

Theatre) 
Home management. Gladys J. Ward and 

Ruth Crawford Freeman (210 Woman's 

Building) 
Markets. Grace B. Armstrong (231 Woman's 

Building) 
Recreation. Mrs. Spencer Ewing (Gregorian 

Hall) 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Group singing 

What the Bureau of Home Economics does 
for the homemaker. Ruth O'Brien, Chief, 
Division of Textiles and Clothing, Bureau of 
Home Economics, U. S. Department of Ag- 
riculture, Washington, D. C. 

Brief reports of outstanding county activities 
1:30- 2:50 Group singing 

The county home bureau program in review 

Fulton Mrs. Paul Reinertsen 

Livingston Mrs. Howard Kelley 

Saline Mrs. Roscoe Pulliam 

The present challenge to the home. Grace E. 
Frysinger, Senior Home Economist, Ex- 
tension Service, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, Washington, D. C. 



[26] 



Special Conferences 



Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association 

The Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association will 
hold their annual winter meeting on Tuesday, January 16, 
at 10 a.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 



Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 

The annual meeting of the Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 
will be held Wednesday, January 17, at 10 a.m., in Room 
205 Old Agriculture. 



Illinois Guernsey Breeders Association 

The annual winter meeting of the Illinois Guernsey 
Breeders Association will be held Thursday, January 18, 
at 10 a.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association 

The annual business meeting of the Illinois Crop Im- 
provement Association will be held on Wednesday, Jan- 
uary 17, at 4 p.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 

The annual banquet of the Illinois Crop Improvement 
Association will be held at Hanley's, Wednesday, January 
17, 5:30 to 7:45 p.m. An interesting special feature in ad- 
dition to a short program will follow the dinner. Medals 
will be awarded to winners in the Ten- Acre Corn-Growing 
Contest as well as in the Utility Corn Show. Everyone 
attending Farm and Home Week is invited to attend. 



Annual School for Grain Judges 

(600 Old Agriculture) 

During Farm and Home Week the Department of 
Agronomy and the Illinois Crop Improvement Association 
conducts a school for seed and grain judges. At the con- 
clusion of the school an examination is held and certifi- 
cates of "Certified Grain Judge" awarded to those who 
successfully complete the week's work and pass the ex- 
amination. 

Illinois Seed Grain Show 

(Fourth Floor, New Agriculture) 

The Illinois Seed Grain Show and the Fourteenth 
Annual Utility Corn Show will be held in connection with 
Farm and Home Week. 

The Corn Show will be open to visitors at 1 p.m. Mon- 
day, January 15, and will remain open thruout the week. 
The best hours to visit the show are 8:00 a.m. and from 
4 to 6 p.m. daily. 

Illinois Farm Managers' Association 

The Illinois Farm Managers' Association will meet at 
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, January 16, in Newman Foundation. 



[27] 



Art Extension Committee Meeting 

Wednesday 

Mrs. J. T. Inghram, Quincy, presiding 

9:00-10:50 Contribution of home economics to art ex- 
tension. Isabel Bevier 

The charm of glass. Virginia Weaver 
Color and design in home furnishings. Isa- 

belle Hitchcock (South Parlor, Second 

Floor, Woman's Building) 

J. C. Blair, presiding 

1:00- 1:50 New conceptions of landscape planning. K. B. 

Lohmann (103 New Agriculture) 
2:00- 2:50 Landscape architecture and outdoor recreation. 

O. G. Schaffer (103 New Agriculture) 
4:00- 4:30 Concert, University of Illinois Orchestra, F. 

B. Stiven, Director (Smith Memorial Hall) 

Thursday 
O. G. Schaffer, presiding 

9:00-10:50 Gardens of yesterday and today. I. L. Peter- 
son 
Modern garden design. S. H. White 
Planting design in relation to structure. Flor- 
ence Robinson (103 New Agriculture) 

L. H. Provine, presiding 
1:00- 1:50 Illinois pioneer architecture. Illustrated. Earl 
Reed, Jr. President, Chicago Chapter Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects, Head of De- 
partment of Architecture, Armour Institute 
of Technology, Chicago 

2:00- 2:50 The architecture of old Kentucky. Illustrated. 
Rexford Newcomb (120 Architecture) 

Music and Drama Tournament Finals 

Thursday 

8:00- 8:50 Rehearsal for winning play groups. (Audi- 
torium) 

9:00-10:50 Annual meeting of the state representatives. 
Jesse Prather, Champaign, presiding (214 
New Agriculture) 
1:00- 2:50 Annual state rural music tournament. (Audi- 
torium) 
4:00- 6:00 Rehearsals of music groups for participation 
in the annual rural music festival. 
Men's quartets (103 Smith Memorial Hall) 
Mixed quartets (200 Smith Memorial Hall) 
Ladies' quartets (106 Smith Memorial Hall) 
Orchestras (Orchestra Room, basement, 
Smith Memorial Hall) 
Rehearsal period for play groups. (Auditori- 
um) 
6:00- 7:00 Annual dinner of participants in the 1933-34 
music and drama tournament. (Cafeteria, 
Woman's Building) 
7:30-10:00 Annual state rural drama tournament and 
music festival. (Auditorium) 

[28 1 



Exhibits 



Exhibits for the Farm and Home 
(Second Floor Gymnasium, Woman's Building) 

I. Farm food products and their use 

1. Eggs 

Preparations of eggs Eor market. A candling device 
to grade eggs for marketing. Exterior quality dif- 
Ferences in eggs. Correct packing of eggs. 

2. / 'egetables 

Pit storage of vegetables with effect of temperature on 

storage. Forced plants. Rhubarb winter-forced for 
early spring use. The effect of time of cooking on 
food content and edibility of vegetables. 

3. Meats 

Preservation of meats at various stages of cure. Dis- 
play of meats in various methods of preservation. 
Cost of preservation. Mimeographed material giving 
methods of preserving meats. 

4. Fruits 

Cider made from different varieties of apples ; made 
by various types of press ; and kept in various 
methods of storage. A display of Illinois produced 
nuts. Low-cost construction of a cold storage unit. 

5. Honey 

Bee hive set up to show method of producing the 
different kinds of honey. Care and use of honey. 
Foods showing uses and mimeographed materials on 
uses. 

6. Dairy products 

Display of equipment for use in making butter, cheese, 
ice cream, etc. 

7. Ways of using Illinois farm products 

Soybean, flour, milk, and eggs in combination, and 
grains. Suggested ways of using with recipes. 

8. Measurements take the guessing out of cooking 

Cooking thermometers used for meat, for candy, for 
deep fat frying, and for the oven. Correct measure- 
ments make standard products. 

9. Dietetics and nutrition 

Food as related to health, showing effect of inadequate 
diets on man and animals. Food for the sick and 
how to serve it. 

II. Quality in selection of goods 

1. Mattresses 

Cross-sections of mattresses showing content and con- 
struction in relation to grades. Mattresses made 
from waste cotton, from excellent fiber cotton ; coil 
spring mattresses of various grades. 

2. Bath tozuels 

Display showing how good towels should be judged. 
Arrangement of fibers, the twist, the thread count. 
Illustrations of good and poor towels. 

3. Blankets 

What to look for when you buy blankets — percentage 
of wool and cotton, tensile strength, weight, binding. 
A display of these factors. 

[29] 



4. Canned food 

Official size cans by name. Grades of canned food. 
Look for what should be on a label. 

III. Household operation 

1. Equipment 

("are and upkeep of equipment. The proper care of 
the electric motor. The repair of an electric iron, 
an iron cord, etc. Safety in use of equipment. 

2. Control of household pests 

A display of the clothes moth, carpet beetle, etc. . . . 
with methods of eradication and control. 

3. Wool 

Fleeces of wool showing different grades produced in 
Illinois. Uses made of the various grades, such as 
fabric, bats, etc. . . . Mimeographed material on 
care and preparation of fleeces for household use. 

IV. Floriculture 

1. A display of flowers suitable and unsuitable for house- 
hold use. Potted plants you can grow in any home. 
Cut flowers for home use. Hothouse flowers. 

V. Safety in the home 
1. Make your home a safe place in which to live. 

VI. Book exhibit 

1. Books for the homemaker's library concerning food, 
clothing, management, and child care. Also a display 
of books for children. 



Agricultural Engineering 

In addition to the tractors, gas engines, field and har- 
vesting machinery, home equipment, and other equipment 
normally on display in the Agricultural Engineering Build- 
ing, there will be a special exhibit of weed control and 
seed-cleaning machinery. Seed-cleaning demonstrations 
will be given on Thursday and Friday. There will also be 
exhibits featuring (1) noxious weeds, (2) plow equip- 
ment, (3) tractor and motor car lubrication, (4) methods 
of preventing soil erosion, (5) farm building plans and 
materials. Moving pictures will be shown each day during 
the noon hour, and a lunch stand will be operated in the 
building by the students. 



Agronomy 

The fourth floor of the New Agricultural Building will 
be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Among the exhibits 
pertaining to soils and crops are the following: State 
Corn Show, acre-yield exhibit, certified seed exhibit, 
lespedeza exhibit, soil testing exhibit, chinch bug control, 
chinch-bug-resistant varieties of corn, weed exhibit, fed- 
eral grain-grading exhibit, corn-hog adjustment exhibit, 
and the general agricultural exhibit. Take the elevator at 
the north end of the first floor, New Agricultural Building. 



Animal Husbandry 

Livestock sanitation exhibit may be seen in the Animal 
Pathology Building, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Here may be 



[30] 



seen the exhibits on the prevention of rabies, coccidiosis, 
fowl tuberculosis, pullorum disease, and poultry parasites, 

and those on sanitation and hygiene in disease control. 
Big team models mu\ be seen in the Stoek Pavilion, 8 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. daily. 

Bulletin Exhibit 

Bulletins and circulars of the College of Agriculture 
are on exhibit in the Auditorium. With this are forms on 
which visitors may apply for the bulletins and circulars 
they desire. Names may be put on the bulletin mailing list 
thru this channel. Last year many visitors took advantage 
of this information and a total of 9,601 bulletins were dis- 
tributed. 

Dairy Products 

To assist farmers of Illinois in securing more profit- 
able outlets for milk and cream, the division of Dairy 
Manufactures has arranged an exhibit that will show the 
best methods of preparing dairy products for market. 
Methods of manufacture and suggestions for packages and 
containers will be made. The more common defects oc- 
curring in butter, cheese, milk, and cream will be illus- 
trated and remedies will be suggested. New uses for dairy 
products will be presented and new types of dairy spreads 
will be demonstrated. Varieties of the more common types 
of ripened cheeses will be on display. This exhibit should 
be of interest to the farm-dairy operator as well as the 
farm wife. (Second Floor Gymnasium, Woman's Build- 
ing) 

Horticulture 

In the Vegetable Greenhouses will be found a crop of 
tomatoes and other vegetables grown under glass during 
the winter months. 

A wide variety of foliage and flowering plants, includ- 
ing roses, carnations, snapdragons, ferns, palms, and many 
other ornamentals will be on display at the Floricultural 
Greenhouses. 

An exhibit of nuts and a display of horticultural litera- 
ture will be found in the lobby of the Horticultural Field 
Laboratory. 

These buildings will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
daily. 

Museums 

I. Classical Archaeology and Art, European Culture, 
Oriental Museum — Top floor Lincoln Hall, open from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, elevator service. These museums 
consist of collections of originals and reproductions of 
works of art, coins, arms and armour, peasant costumes, 
theatre models, ship models, wood and ivory carvings, 
early musical instruments, pottery, mummy case fragments 
and mummified sacred birds from Egypt, objects from 
Palestine, and models of domestic furniture and pre- 
historic implements from the Near East. 

II. Natural History Museum — Third floor Natural His- 
tory Building, open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Exhibits 
of special interest are: Group showing injurious apple 
insects; group showing injurious corn insects; consumers 
products made from corn ; consumers products made from 
cotton and cocoa ; how buttons are made ; pearls and their 
culture; clothing and food of the Esquimaux; clothing 
of the Australians; birds useful to the farmer; the his- 
tory of the horse; and ancient man and his descendants. 
In addition there can be seen a large collection and exhibit 
of Indian culture and animal and geological life. 

[31] 



REFLECTIONS FROM PREVIOUS YEARS 



I ha vi' attended Farm and Home Week at the University of 
Illinois for the past thirteen years. . . . i .:.'. t year I was much 
interested in the "Woodlot of the Farm" and think tree conser- 
vation shoidd be emphasized more in our state. ... I think the 
whole program very fine and instructive both for the ladies and the 
men. .Mrs. Wilson and 1 expect to attend again this year. 

F. V. Wilson 
__ Edgewood, Illinois 

I attended the full session of Farm and Home Week in 1931 
and the last three days in 1932. . . . The most interesting thing 
to me was the hog feeding course. The time given in that course 
to mineral feeding has saved me a good many dollars in high- 
priced minerals. 

As we had just installed electricity on our farm, the electrical 
course was very interesting to me. It explained how one could 
use electricity on a farm to advantage and also the way it was 
used on many farms at an actual loss. 

.... If a farmer has any money whatever for a vacation 
there is no better way to spend it than take a trip to Urbana for 
Farm and Home Week, because he will have a fine vacation and 
will learn many things which will help him in his work and save 
him dollars as long as he lives. I expect to attend Farm and 
Home Week every year as long as it is possible for me to do so. 

Paul F. Lane 
Prophetstown, Illinois 

Attending Farm and Home Week gives me an opportunity to 
attend the Annual Grain and Seed Show. ... It also gives me 
up-to-date information on new and old farm problems alike. . . . 
Studying the results of many experiments that are conducted by 
the University is also helpful. Farm and Home Week offers a 
week's vacation for me. 

Glenn Reves 

Morris, Illinois 

I have spent most of my time while attending Farm and Home 
Week in the poultry classes. I am operating and trying to own and 
pay for a 400-acre farm. Poultry is a side line of the work of 
this farm, but with the help I have received from the University 
and attending the classes at Farm and Home Week, I have managed 
to make it quite profitable. In fact, we have sold enough eggs 
from our flock of 500 hens to very nearly pay our hired help for 
the past three years. 

I have also gained a great deal from the courses in economics. 

It is hard for me to express in words my appreciation of the 
very splendid treatment we received from both the faculty and 
students during our visits with you at the University, and for the 
plain and simple manner and terms in which the classes are con- 
ducted so that we who are liot college graduates can derive the 
most benefit. That is one thing I have thought would be hard, to 
keep from talking "over our heads." 

G. V. Gray 

Aledo, Illinois 

I have attended Farm and Home Week the last four years. I 
took up grain judging for the first three years. I have put this 
knowledge into practice, and have built up an excellent seed corn 
business, having sent seed to six different states in 1933. It also 
has been invaluable to me, as well as to my neighbors in buying 
legume seeds free of noxious weeds. 

The average cost of my week at Urbana w£s $15. I have felt 
repaid many times for this investment. 

I think the ones who have made it possible should be con- 
gratulated on the success of the Farm and Home Week for the last 
few years in bringing together the farm folks for recreation as well 
as education. I am planning to be with you again this year. 

E. W. Doubet 

Hanna City, Illinois 

My son attended Farm and Home Week with our farm adviser 
two years ago and I will say that it has been of much value to 
him, for he came home with new enthusiasm and zeal and with 
information that gave him a new viewpoint of farming and farming 
operations. It would be hard to estimate the benefit that he re- 
ceived from the week that he spent at Urbana. 

Norman Davis 
Whitehall, Illinois 

My trip to Farm and Home Week was very educational, and it 
was time well spent. At the present time my father and I are 
feeding fifty head of hogs according to the way taught at the 
University and I find the instructions very helpful. It was a trip 
that I will never forget. 

Garvin Day 

Whitehall, Illinois 



UNIVERSITYOF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Vol. XXXII January 15. 1935 No. 20 



Annual 
Farm and 

Home 

Week 
Program^ 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

January 14 to 18 
1935 



Program by Days 3-14 

Program by Courses 15-28 

Special Conferences 29-32 

Exhibits 33-36 



College of Agriculture 
University of Illinois 
Urbana-Champaign 



Published Weekly by the University of Illinois 

Entered as second-class matter December 11, 1912, at the 
post office at Urbana, Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 
1912. Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, au- 
thorized July 31, 1918. 



INFORMATION FOR VISITORS 

Registration — Every visitor is urged to register im- 
mediately upon arrival. There is no registration fee. 
Registration headquarters will be maintained in the 
University Auditorium during the entire week. Regis- 
tration for the Homemakers Conference will be held in 
the lobby of Lincoln Hall. At the time of registering 
you will be given an official Farm and Home Week 
badge. 

Daily Program — The daily program will consist of 
courses offered by the different departments of the College 
of Agriculture, lectures and talks by prominent speakers, 
recreational features, special exhibits, and an entertaining 
program each evening. 

Those attending will be encouraged to register for 
courses in which they are particularly interested and to 
attend them regularly thruout the week. In this way it is 
possible to get the greatest benefit from the courses 
selected. 

Conference Hour — The hour 8 to 9 each morning 
has been reserved for conference with members of the 
College staff or others. Inquire at the registration desk 
for assistance in locating anyone you may wish to see. 

Locating Lecture Rooms and Laboratories — The lo- 
cation of rooms and laboratories is indicated on this pro- 
gram by room number and name of building. Signs in 
each building will direct you to the room desired. In the 
New Agricultural Building all rooms with numbers in the 
one hundreds are on the first floor, all in the two hundreds 
on the second floor, etc. 

Exhibits — Farm and Home Week guests should avail 
themselves of the opportunity of visiting the many exhibits 
on the campus pertaining to subjects of both agricultural 
and general interest. A brief description of the exhibits 
will be found at the back of this program. 

Meals — Meals may be secured at numerous restau- 
rants near the University campus. Noon lunch will be 
served at the Home Economics Cafeteria in the Woman's 
Building. The basement gymnasium will be open to any- 
one who cares to bring his lunch. Coffee, soup, and milk 
may be obtained there. Student agricultural clubs plan to 
serve lunches. Announcements will be made at the Audi- 
torium. 

Rooms — A list of rooms available in the University 
district for Farm and Home Week visitors will be main- 
tained at the registration desk in the Auditorium. 

Lost and Found — Articles lost should be reported 
and those found turned in to registration headquarters in 
the Auditorium. 

Guides — Agricultural students and faculty members 
will wear badges indicating that they are guides. Feel free 
to ask them and others on the campus for information. 

Illness and Accidents — Illness or accidents should be 
promptly reported to the registration desk in the Audi- 
torium. First aid service will be rendered by the Univer- 
sity Health Station, telephone 7-1821. 



[2] 



Program by Days 



(For Art Extension and Community Planning Conferences, 

sec page 30) 

(For Homemakers Conference, sec page 28) 

(For Illinois Society for Farm Managers Conference, 
sec page 31) 



MONDAY— JANUARY 14 
Monday — 9:00 a.m. 

Registration — Auditorium 

Monday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Outlook of short-time credit for Illinois 
farmers. Jordan (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Principles governing the selection of farm 
machinery. Wills (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Alfalfa insects and the corn ear worm. Bigger 
(128 New Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — When and when not to feed minerals. 
Hamilton (330 Nezv Agr.) 
Demonstration — Judging fowls for egg production.* 

Sloan (Stock Pavilion) 
Demonstration — Sexing baby chicks. Alp (331 New 
Agr.) 

Dairy — Planning economical rations for dairy cows. 
Nevens (127 Nezv Agr.) 

Hort. — Adaptation of grape varieties to Illinois. Colby 
(326 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — The rural community and the council of 
churches. Shike (214 Nezv Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — The 4-H leader's place in a creative 
program. Rohrbough (Gregorian Hall, Third Floor, 
W.B.) 

Home Econ. — When you buy textiles. Whitlock (First 
Floor, South Parlor, W.B.) 



Monday — 2:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ., Agron., & Anim. Husb. — Meeting our most 
serious feed and seed situation. Hackleman (103 
Nezv Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Common mistakes in the adjustment and 
operation of field machines. Shawl (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Anim. Husb. — Demonstration — Judging fowls for egg pro- 
duction.* Sloan (Stock Pavilion) 

Hort. — Harvesting and storage of grapes. Colby (326 
Nezv Agr.) 

Tomato culture in a hot, dry season. Huelsen (118 New 
Agr.) 



*Programs designated by an asterisk are not completed in one 
hour. See preceding or following schedules for full program. 



[3] 



Home Econ. — Hygiene and health on the farm. Tanner 
(First Floor, South Parlor, IV. B.) 

Rural Organ. — Rurai rehabilitation and the rural church. 
Dance (214 New Agr.) 

Monday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
W. L. Burlison, presiding 

A year's study of the agriculture of Russia. Dr. H. W. 

Alberts, who spent one year with the U.S.S.R. 
Plant Institute in Russia. (Preceded by piano selec- 
tions, Sherman Schoonmaker) 



Monday — 5:30 p!m. 

Agricultural Alumni Banquet — Lower Gymnasium 
Woman's Building 

The agriculture of Alaska. Dr. H. W. Alberts, formerly 
director of the Experiment Station at Sitka, Alaska 



Monday — 8:00 p.m. 

General Session — Men's New Gymnasium 

Exhibition by University gymnastic, wrestling, fencing, 
and swimming teams 



TUESDAY— JANUARY 15 
Tuesday — 8:00 a.m. 

Agron. — Group discussion of seed situation. By staff (110 
Old Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — AAA discussion demonstrations. Edgar 
county team (103 Neiv Agr.) 



Tuesday— 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Why some farms pay better than others. 
Mosher (127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Cutting and field curing of hay. Reed (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Soil treatment practices for changing conditions. 
Bauer (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Important points in selecting horses. 
Demonstration and judging.* Edmonds (Stock Pa- 
vilion) 

Disappointments in poultry breeding. Card (128 New 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping. — The working tools of the bees. Burks 
Know your bees. Milum (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 



[4] 



Dairy Demonstrations and judging Newer conceptions 
oi individuality in cattle.* Yapp and Kuih.man 

{St Oil: l\i ril i on) 

Manufacture of soft cheeses.* TUCKEY (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Sampling and testing milk for fat by the Babcock test.* 
Overman and Garrett (503 Old Agr.) 

Hort. — Fruit bud studies of the grape in relation to fruit- 
fulness.* McMunn (326 New Agr.) 
Arrangement of cut flowers for the home. Dorner (118 
Nezv Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — National objectives in rural rehabilitation. 
Westbrook (214 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — The child's own library. Greer. Books for 
grown-ups. Price (First Floor, South Parlor, W.'B.) 



Tuesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Farm lease problems. Case (127 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Storing hay in mow, stack, and bale. Young 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Soils and soil management for alfalfa in Illinois. 
Lang (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Important points in selecting horses. 
Demonstration and judging.* Edmonds (Stock Pa- 
vilion) 

Marketing Illinois eggs. Alp (128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Types of hives and methods of assembling. 
Milum (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstrations and judging — Newer conceptions 
of individuality in cattle.* Yapp and Kuhlman 
(Stock Pavilion) 

Manufacture of soft cheeses.* Tuckey (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Sampling and testing milk for fat by the Babcock test.* 
Overman and Garrett (503 Old Agr.) 

Hort. — Fruit bud studies of the grape in relation to fruit- 
fulness.* McMunn (326 New Agr.) 

Commercial methods applicable to home canning. Huel- 
sen (118 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — New views of familiar foods. Munger 
(First Floor, South Parlor, IV. B.) 

Music and Drama — Rehearsal for state chorus. (Smith 
Memorial Hall) 



Tuesday— 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

W. W. McLaughlin, presiding 

Rural Rehabilitation. Col. Lawrence Westbrook, As- 
sistant Administrator of the Federal Emergency Re- 
lief Administration, Washington, D.C. (Preceded by 
selections, University Men's Glee Club. LeRoy Hamp, 
conductor) 



[5] 



Tuesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Outlook for Illinois agriculture in 1935 as in- 
fluenced by:* (a) General economic trends and gov- 
ernment policy. Norton (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Modern hay harvesting machinery. Kranick 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Making a good crop better — alfalfa. Hackleman 
(600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Swine feeding practices that increase 
profits. Carroll (330 New Agr.) 
Stopping the leaks in a poultry business. Card (128 New 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — The chemical composition of some Illinois 
honeys. Lynn 
Other characteristics of honey. Milum (104 Exp. Zool. 
Lab.) 

Dairy — Current problems in feeding dairy cattle. Nevens 
(127 New Agr.) 
Common flavor defects in milk and cream. Tracy 
(Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Pruning and training young grapevines.* Colby 
(326 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Panel discussion. The new impact of vital 
religion on the changing rural order.* Northcott 
(214 New Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — Another leaf for the 4-H clover. Rohr- 
bough (Gregorian Hall, Third Floor, W.B.) 

Home Econ. — Measures of growth and nutrition. Out- 
house (First Floor, South Parlor, W.B.) 



Tuesday— 2:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ. — Outlook for Illinois agriculture in 1935 as in- 
fluenced by:* (b) Production and consumption trends. 
Jordan (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Special methods and equipment for handling 
hay. Reed (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — New developments in liming. Linsley (600 Old 

Agr.) 
Anim. Husb. — Economical methods of feeding cattle on 
pasture. Rusk (330 New Agr.) 
Poultry management plans for 1935. Alp (128 Neiv 
Agr.) 
Beekeeping — Honey extracting demonstrations. Milum 

(104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 
Dairy — Manufacture of special dairy products. Tracy 

(Dairy Mfrs.) 
Hort. — Pruning and training young grapevines.* Colby 
(326 New Agr.) 
New and improved varieties of vegetables. Weaver (118 
New Agr.) 
Rural Organ. — Panel discussion. The new impact of vital 
religion on the changing rural order.* Northcott 
(214 New Agr.) 
Home Econ. — Keynotes in costumes. Eades and Beam 
(First Floor, South Parlor, W.B.) 



[6] 



Tuesday— 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
J. C. Bl a ik, presiding 

Rural Architecture — an Expression of American Life. 
Dean Rexford Newcomh, College of Fine and Ap- 
plied Arts, University of Illinois (Preceded by vocal 
solos, Bruce R. Foote, baritone) 

Tuesday — 5:15 p.m. 

Stockmen's Banquet — Hanleys 

Some things I have observed about successful stock- 
men. H. C. Horneman, Danville 

Tuesday — 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
D. E. Lindstrom, presiding 

Band Concert by one of the University of Illinois Bands 
Mid-year recital of the Illinois Counties' Rural Chorus 



WEDNESDAY— JANUARY 16 
Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. 

Agron. — Answers to soil problems. By staff (110 Old 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Do the bees vacation in winter? Milum 
(104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Rural Organ. — AAA discussion demonstrations. McLean 
county team (103 New Agr.) 

Wednesday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Field arrangements and cropping systems. 
Andrews and Cunningham (127 New Agr.) 
Constructive competition vs. monopoly and destructive 
competition in the farm production and marketing 
of milk. Bartlett. What the Milk Market Ad- 
ministration under the AAA is doing to help Illinois 
farmers. Lynch and Shipley (Morrow Hall) 

Agr. Engin. & Agron. — Aiding nature in erosion control. 
Fisher (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Attaining success in sheep raising. Kamm- 

lade (330 Nezv Agr.) 
Methods of cutting and canning beef and lamb.* Bull 

and Henderson (Meat Lab., Old Agr.) 
Recent findings in poultry research. Card (128 New 

Agr.) 

Beekeeping — How shall we aid our bees in winter and 
spring? Cale. Bee hysteria. Killion (104 Exp. Zool. 
Lab.) 

[7] 



Dairy — The calf club problem and need of club leader- 
ship. Pilchard (Stock Pavilion) 

Manufacture of cheddar cheese.* Tuckey (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Sampling and testing cream by the Babcock test.* Over- 
man and Garrett (503 Old Agr.) 

Hort. — Planting the vineyard. Marsh (326 Nezv Agr.) 
Roses for the home garden. Hall (118 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Basic considerations for a rural rehabilita- 
tion program in Illinois. Humphrey (214 New Agr.) 



Wednesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — A unified AAA contract. Johnston (127 
Nezv Agr.) 

Economics of milk distribution. Wasserman. Discus- 
sion. Hepburn (Morrozu Hall) 

Agr. Engin. — Terracing and contour farming. Hay (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Farm management for the protection of birds and 
game. Yeatter (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Solving 1935 livestock feeding problems. 
Robbins (330 New Agr.) 
Methods of cutting and canning beef and lamb.* Bull 

and Henderson (Meat Lab., Old Agr.) 
The relation of hereditary resistance and susceptibility 
to the mortality problem. Roberts (128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Colony management for extracted honey pro- 
duction. Cale (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Selection, care, and management of the Dairy Club 
calf. Yapp. What the Dairy Calf Club has meant to 
me. Demunn and Kainz (Stock Pavilion) 

Manufacture of cheddar cheese.* Tuckey (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Sampling and testing cream by the Babcock test.* Over- 
man and Garrett (503 Old Agr.) 

Hort. — Soil management of the vineyard. Marsh (326 
Nezv Agr.) 

Dependable vegetables in unfavorable seasons. Lloyd 
(118 New Agr.) 



Wednesday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

H. C. M. Case, presiding 

The capacity of the United States to produce and to 
consume agricultural products. Dr. E. G. Nourse, 
Brookings Institute, Washington, D.C. (Preceded by 
selections, University String Quartet) 



Wednesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Marketing of strawberries. Decker (103 
Nezv Agr.) 



[8] 



Problems of collective bargaining associations under the 
Milk Market Administration. Geyer, Tiedeman, and 
Countiss t Morrow Hall) 

Agr Engin. — Terrace requirements, construction, and 
maintenance. Olson (201 Agr. Engin.) 

AgRON. — Hybrid corn: what it is and how it is produced. 
Holbert, Wood-worth, and Duncan (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Livestock outlook. Johnston (330 New 
Agr.) 

The relation of general economic conditions to the poul- 
try industry. Norton (128 Nezu Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Producing comb honey. Killion (104 Exp. 
Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Manufacture of cheddar cheese.* Tuckey (Dairy 
Mfrs.) 

Inexpensive methods of producing milk of high quality. 
Prucha (127 Nezu Agr.) 

Hort. — Pruning fruiting grapevines.* Colby (326 New 
Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — An economic foundation for good 
recreation. Rohrbough (Gregorian Hall, Third Floor, 
W.B.) 

Forestry — The use of trees for gully control.* Sawyer 
(316 New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — Creative leisure. Ewing. Art in American 
gardens.* Fuller (Little Theatre, Lincoln Hall) 



Wednesday — 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Markets for Illinois vegetables. Lloyd (103 
New Agr.) 

Round table discussion — Milk marketing. Bartlett 
(Morrow Hall) 

Agr. Engin. — Gully control. Ensminger (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Fighting the chinch bug in 1935. Farrar (600 
Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Cutting the tankage bill with good hog 
pastures. Carroll (330 New Agr.) 

Adapting our farm poultry operations to changing con- 
ditions. Kempster (128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Saving the beeswax. Cale. Requeening — 
why, when, and how to do it? Earle (104 Exp. Zool. 
Lab.) 

Dairy — Manufacture of cheddar cheese.* S. L. Tuckey 
(Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Pruning fruiting grapevines.* Colby (326 New 
Agr.) 

Relation of weather and other factors to the prevalence 
of vegetable diseases. Kadow (118 New Agr.) 

Forestry — The use of trees for gully control.* Sawyer 
(316 New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — Art in American gardens.* Fuller (Little 
Theatre, Lincoln Hall) 



[9] 



Wednesday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

Dean H. W. Mumford, presiding 

Address— President Arthur Cutts Willard, University 
of Illinois (Preceded by vocal solos, Dorothy Bowen, 
soprano) 

Wednesday — 4:00 p.m. 

Art Exten.— Orchestra concert. Professor F. B. Stiven, 
Director (Smith Memorial Hall) 

Wednesday — 5:30 p.m. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association Banquet 

Readjusting the work of crop improvement associations 
to meet present conditions. — O. S. Fisher (Lower 
gymnasium, Woman's Building) 

Wednesday — 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Men's New Gymnasium 
G. S. Randall, presiding 

Winter Festival. Directed by Lynn T. Rohrbough, Di- 
rector, Church Recreation League of Ohio 



THURSDAY— JANUARY 17 



Thursday— 8:00 a.m. 

Agr. Engin. — Some power and machinery problems. Leh- 
mann (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Corn question box. By staff (110 Old Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Races and strains of bees. Cale. Saving 
time, steps, and worry in the apiary. Peterson (104 
Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Rural Organ. — AAA discussion demonstrations. Ran- 
dolph county team (103 New Agr.) 

Thursday— 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Regional aspects of Illinois land use prob- 
lems. Schoenmann 
Replanning Illinois land uses for crop and livestock 

production. Hudelson (Auditorium) 
Changes in types of farming in Illinois. Case (127 
New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — What farmers must do to have electric 
service. Lehmann (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Choosing pasture plants and mixtures. Burlison 
and Pieper (600 Old Agr.) 



[10] 



Anim. Husb. — Selecting cows for baby beef production.* 
Snapp (Stock Pavuiori) 
Methods of cutting and curing pork.* Bull and Hen 

DERSON {Meat Lab., Old ■ /<//'.) 

Feeding the laying flock. Sloan ( 128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping -Adult bee diseases and pests. Milum. Diag- 
nosing brood disease. Cale (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Building a herd upon the scientific principles of 
breeding.* Yapp and Kuhlman (Stock Pavilion) 
Buttermaking.* Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Grape insects and their control.* Farrar (326 
Nezu Agr.) 

Lawns and lawn grasses. Weinard (118 Nezu Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — State objectives in rural rehabilitation. 
Humphrey (214 Nezu Agr.) 

Art Exten. — How to organize a citizen's agency for com- 
munity betterment. Lawrence (Hall of Casts, Arch. 
Bldg.) 

Thursday— 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Replanning Illinois land for forest and wood- 
lot production. Sawyer. Replanning Illinois land uses 
for recreation and game production. Lodge. Round 
table discussion. (Auditorium) 
Cost of producing livestock and livestock products. Ross 
(127 Nezv Agr.) 

Agron. — The soil requirements of pastures. Linsley (600 
Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Selecting cows for baby beef production.* 
Snapp (Stock Pavilion) 
Methods of cutting and curing pork.* Bull and Hen- 
derson (Meat Lab., Old Agr.) 
Housing farm poultry. Kempster (128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Apiary inspection and methods of bee dis- 
ease control. Duax (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Building a herd upon the scientific principles of 
breeding.* Yapp and Kuhlman (Stock Pavilion) 
Buttermaking.* Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Grape insects and their control.* Farrar (326 New 
Agr.) 
The fall vegetable garden. Weaver (118 New Agr.) 

Music and Drama — Annual business meeting for delegates 
of the Illinois music and drama tournament. (214 
New Agr.) 

Art Exten. — Objectives in national planning and the 
citizen's interest. James (Hall of Casts, Arch. Bldg.) 



Thursday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

C. L. Stewart, presiding 

The outlook for planned land use. Dr. L. C. Gray, 
Chief, Land Policy Section, Agricultural Adjustment 
Administration, Washington, D.C. (Preceded by selec- 
tions, University Women's Glee Club, L. F. Demming, 
conductor) 



[11] 



Thursday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Livestock outlook for 1935. Johnston (103 
New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Care and operation of tractors. Shawl (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. & Anim. Husb. — Increasing the value of pastures 
by management. Edmonds (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Feeding young chicks. Sloan (128 Nezv 
Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Do we need beekeepers' associations? Peter- 
son. How shall we advertise our product? Osborne 
(104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Butter judging.* Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Methods of producing high-quality cream for butter- 
making; grading cream. Prucha (127 New Agr.) 

Hort. — Grape diseases and their control.* Anderson 
(326 New Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — Three popular projects for local 4-H 
clubs. Rohrbough (Gregorian Hall, Third Floor, 
W.B.) 

Forestry — Management and protection of woodlands ; util- 
zation and marketing of woodland products.* Sawyer 
(316 Nezv Agr.) 

Art Exten. & Agr. Econ. — The replanning program and 
our public finances. Hunter. Concentration of tax- 
delinquent rural lands. Stewart. (Hall of Casts, 
Arch. Bldg.) 



Thursday— 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Recent developments in the direct marketing 
of livestock. Ashby (103 Nezv Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Rubber tires for tractors. Shawl (201 Agr. 
Engin.) 

Agron. — Emergency forage in chinch bug and drouth 
areas. Pieper. (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Animal health is wealth. Graham (330 
Nezv Agr.) 
Brooding and rearing chicks. Card (128 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Preparing the crop for the market. Duax. 
Grading and marketing our product. Cale (104 Exp. 
Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Cream whipping. Tracy (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Grape diseases and their control.* Anderson (326 
Nezv Agr.) 
Irrigation systems applicable to Illinois gardens. Somers 
(118 Nezv Agr.) 

Forestry — Management and protection of woodlands ; utili- 
zation and marketing of woodland products.* Sawyer 
(316 New Agr.) 

Art Exten. & Agr. Econ. — Coordination between local 
community planning and the larger regional plans. 
McCurdy (Hall of Casts, Arch. Bldg.) 



[12] 



Thursday— 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
Ruth A. Wardall, presiding 

The effect of the home on citizenship. Judge Camille 
Kelley, Juvenile Court, Nashville, Tennessee (Pre- 
ceded by vocal solos, Kathryn Janik Suthi run, 
soprano) 

Thursday — 4:00 p.m. 

MUSIC and Drama — The fifth annual music tournament 
(Smith Memorial Hall) 

Art Exten. — The development of a typical community 
planning venture. Lohmann (Hall of Casts, Arch. 
Bldg.) 

Thursday— 5:00 p.m. 

Music and Drama — Rehearsal of quartet ensembles. 
(Basement of Smith Memorial Hall) 



Thursday — 6:00 p.m. 

Annual dinner of participants in the 1934-35 Music and 

Drama Tournament 

(Cafeteria, Woman's Building) 



Thursday— 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

D. E. Lindstrom, presiding 

State music and drama tournament 

An admission fee of 25 cents will be charged for the tour- 
nament. The proceeds will be used to help pay the 
expenses of the participating groups. 



FRIDAY— JANUARY 18 



Friday— 8:00 a.m. 



Agr. Engin. — Farm home equipment standards. Lehmann 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Pasture round table. By staff (110 Old Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — AAA discussion demonstrations. Effing- 
ham county team (103 New Agr.) 



Friday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Cost of producing crops. Ross (127 New 
Agr.) 



[13] 



Agr. Engin. — Farmstead and farm house improvement. 
Foster (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Small grains for pasture, hay, and grain. Dungan 
(600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Answering questions from the question 
box.* Rusk and others (330 N,eiv Agr.) 
Merchandising the turkey crop. Jones. Question box on 
turkey marketing. Alp (128 Nezv Agr.) 

Dairy — The dairy farm as a unit. Fraser (205 Old Agr.) 
Demonstration — Making ice cream, sherbets, ices, and 
fancy ice cream.* Tracy (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Questions on fruits and fruit production.* By 
staff (326 New Agr.) 
Plants for the beginner's rock garden. Hanley (118 
Nezv Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Progress made on rural rehabilitation in 
Illinois. Humphrey (214 New Agr.) 

Home Econ. — Factors affecting family life today. Tim- 
mons (First Floor, South Parlor, W.B.) 

Art Exten. — Panel discussion. The interrelated arts. 
Palmer (Little Theatre, Lincoln Hall) 



Friday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Labor, power, and machinery costs. Wills 
(127 Nezv Agr.) 

Agron. — New facts about lespedeza. Sears (600 Old Agr.) 

Anim. Husb. — Answering questions from the question 
box.* Rusk and others. (330 New Agr.) 
Problems in turkey production. Kohlmeyer (128 New 
Agr.) 

Dairy — The dairy farm enterprises with special reference 
to the tenancy problem. Case (205 Old Agr.) 
Demonstration — Making ice cream, sherbets, ices, and 
fancy ice cream.* Tracy (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Questions on fruits and fruit production.* By staff 
(326 New Agr.) 
Practical aspects of garden irrigation. Somers (118 New 
Agr.) 

Home Econ. — The University and the home. Ward-all 
(First Floor, South Parlor, W.B.) 



Friday 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

Dean H. W. Mumford, presiding 
■ 
Agricultural adjustment — some problems ahead. M. L. 
Wilson, Assistant Secretary, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (Preceded by violin 
selections, Harold H. Wick) 



[14] 



Program by Courses 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Outlook and Marketing 
(103 Nezv Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Outlook of short-time credit for Illinois farm- 
ers. G. L. Jordan 

2:00- 2:50 Meeting our most serious feed and seed situa- 
tion. J. C. Hackleman 

Tuesday 

1:00- 2:50 Outlook for Illinois agriculture in 1935 as in- 
fluenced by: 

(a) General economic trends and govern- 

mental policy. L. J. Norton 

(b) Production and consumption trends. G. 

L. Jordan 

Wednesday 

1:00- 1:50 Marketing of strawberries. S. W. Decker 
2:00- 2:50 Markets for Illinois vegetables. J. W. Lloyd 

Thursday 

1:00- 1:50 Livestock outlook for 1935. P. E. Johnston 

2:00- 2:50 Recent developments in the direct marketing 
of livestock. R. C. Ashby 



Farm Land Economic Problems 

(Auditorium) 



Thursday 

C. L. Stewart, presiding 

9:00- 9:50 Regional aspects of Illinois land-use problems. 
L. R. Schoenmann, Regional Director, 
Land Policy Section, AAA, Urbana 
Replanning Illinois land uses for crop and 
livestock production. R. R. Hudelson 

10:00-10:50 Replanning Illinois land for forest and wood- 
lot production. L. E. Sawyer 

Replanning Illinois land uses for recreation 
and game production. W. F. Lodge, Presi- 
dent, Illinois Division, Izaak Walton League 
of America, Inc. 

Round table discussion. 



[15] 



1:00- 1:50 The replanning program and our public finan- 
ces. M. H. Hunter 

Concentration of tax-delinquent rural lands. 
C. L. Stewart. 
(Hall of Casts, Arch. Bldg.) 
Rexford Newcomb, presiding 

2:00- 2:50 Coordination between local community plan- 
ning and the larger regional plans. B. C. 
McCurdy, Engineer, St. Clair county (Hall 
of Casts, Arch. Bldg.) 

3:00- 3:50 County planning as a part of the picture. A. 
C. Gauen, Collinsville, President, Tri- 
County Regional Planning Federation (Hall 
of Casts, Arch. Bldg.) 



Farm Management 

(127 New Agriculture) 



Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Why some farms pay better than others. M. 
L. Mosher 

10:00-10:50 Farm lease problems. H. C. M. Case 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Field arrangements and cropping systems. J. 

B. Andrews and J. B. Cunningham 

10:00-10:50 A unified AAA contract. P. E. Johnston 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Changes in types of farming in Illinois. H. 

C. M. Case 

10:00-10:50 Cost of producing livestock and livestock 
products. R. C. Ross 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Cost of producing crops. R. C. Ross. 

10:00-10:50 Labor, power, and machinery costs. J. E. 
Wills 



Dairy Market Problems 

(Morrow Hall) 



Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Constructive competition vs. monopoly and 
destructive competition in the farm produc- 
tion and marketing of milk. R. W. Bartlett 
What the Milk Market Administration under 
the AAA is doing to help Illinois farmers. 
A. D. Lynch, Secretary-Manager, Sanitary 
Milk Producers, and F. L. Shipley, Market 
Administrator, St. Louis, Missouri 



[16] 



10:00 10:50 Economics of milk distribution. M. J. Was- 

skkm.w, Agricultural Adjustment Admin- 
istration, Washington, D.C. 
Discussion. N. \Y. Hepburn, Executive Sec- 
retary, Illinois Pair}' Products Association, 
Peoria 

1:00- 1:50 Problems of collective bargaining associations 
under the Milk Market Administration. 1 ). 
N. Geyer, Manager, Pure Milk Association, 
Chicago ; E. W. Tiedeman, President, Sani- 
tary Milk Producers, St. Louis; and J. B. 
Countiss, Director of Dairy Marketing, Il- 
linois Agricultural Association, Chicago 

2:00- 2:50 Round table discussion. R. W. Bartlett 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Field Machinery 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Principles governing the selection of farm 
machinery. J. E. Wills 

2:00- 2:50 Common mistakes in the adjustment and oper- 
ation of field machines. R. I. Shawl 



Harvesting and Handling Hay 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Tuesday 
9:00- 9:50 Cutting and field curing of hay. R. H. Reed 

10:00-10:50 Storing hay in mow, stack, and bale. A. L. 

Young 

1:00- 1:50 Modern hay harvesting machinery. F. N. G. 
Kranick, J. I. Case Company 

2:00- 2:50 Special methods and equipment for handling 
hay. R. H. Reed 



Soil Erosion Problems 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Aiding nature in erosion control. F. A. 
Fisher, Director, Soil Erosion Service, U. S. 
D. I. (600 Old Agr.) 

10:00-10:50 Terracing and contour farming. R. C. Hay 

1:00- 1:50 Terrace requirements, construction, and main- 
tenance. Carl Olson, Assistant Director, 
Soil Erosion Service, U. S. D. I. 

*2:00- 2:50 Gully control. M. E. Ensminger, Erosion 
Specialist, Soil Erosion Service, U. S. D. I. 



[17] 



Tractor and Power Problems 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 



Thursday 

8:00- 8:50 Some power and machinery problems. E. W. 

Lehmann 

9:00- 9:50 What farmers must do to have electric serv- 
ice. E. W. Lehmann 

1:00- 1:50 Care and operation of tractors. R. I. Shawl 
2:00- 2:50 Rubber tires for tractors. R. I. Shawl 



Farm Housing Problems 

(201 Agricultural Engineering) 

Friday 

8:00- 8:50 Farm home equipment standards. E. W. Leh- 
mann 

9:00- 9:50 Farmstead and farm house improvement. W. 
A. Foster 



AGRONOMY 



Answering Challenging Current 
Problems in Soils and Crops 

(600 Old Agriculture) 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Alfalfa insects and the corn ear worm. J. H. 
Bigger (128 New Agr.) 

2:00- 2:50 Meeting our most serious feed and seed situa- 
tion. J. C. Hackleman (103 New Agr.) 

Tuesday 

8:00- 8:50 Group discussion of seed situation. By staff 
(110 Old Agr.) 

9:00- 9:50 Soil treatment practices for changing condi- 
tions. F. C. Bauer 

10:00-10:50 Soils and soil management for alfalfa in Illi- 
nois. A. L. Lang 

1:00- 1:50 Making a good crop better — alfalfa. J. C. 
Hackleman 

2:00- 2:50 New developments in liming. C. M. Linsley 

Wednesday 

8:00- 8:50 Answers to soil problems. By staff. (110 Old 
Agr.) 

9:00- 9:50 Aiding nature in erosion control. F. A.' 
Fisher, Director Soil Erosion Service, U. 
S. D. I. 



[18] 



10:00 10:50 Farm management lot the protection of birds 
and game. R. E. Yeatter 

1:00- 1:50 Hybrid corn: what it is and bow it is pro- 
duced. .1. I\. 1 bn BERT, C. M. WOODWORTH, 
and G. H. Duncan 

2:00-2:50 Fighting the chinch bug in 1935. M. D. 
Farrar 

Thursday 

8:00- 8:50 Corn question box. By staff. (110 Old Agr.) 

9:00- 9:50 Choosing pasture plants and mixtures. W. L. 
Burlison and J. J. Pieper 

10:00-10:50 The soil requirements of pastures. C. M. 
Linsley 

1:00- 1:50 Increasing the value of pastures by manage- 
ment. J. L. Edmonds 

2:00- 2:50 Emergency forage in chinch bug and drouth 
areas. J. J. Pieper 

Friday 

8:00- 8:50 Pasture round table. By staff (110 Old Agr.) 

9:00- 9:50 Small grains for pasture, hay, and grain. G. 
H. Dungan 

10:00-10:50 New facts about lespedeza. O. H. Sears 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Livestock Feeding and Management 

(330 New Agriculture) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 When and when not to feed minerals. T. S. 
Hamilton 

2:00- 2:50 Meeting our most serious feed and seed 
situation. J. C. Hackleman (103 New 
Agr.) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Important points in selecting horses. Demon- 
stration and judging. J. L. Edmonds (Stock 
Pavilion) 

1:00- 1:50 Swine feeding practices that increase profits. 
W. E. Carroll 

2:00- 2:50 Economical methods of feeding cattle on 
pasture. H. P. Rusk 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Attaining success in sheep raising. W. G. 
Kammlade 

10:00-10:50 Solving 1935 livestock feeding problems. E. 
T. Robbins 

1:00- 1:50 Livestock outlook. P. E. Johnston 

2:00- 2:50 Cutting the tankage bill with good hog pas- 
tures. W. E. Carroll 



[19] 



Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Selecting cows for baby beef production. 
Demonstration and judging. R. R. Snapp 
(Stock Pavilion) 

1:00- 1:50 Increasing the value of pastures by manage- 
ment. J. L. Edmonds (600 Old Agr.) 

2:00- 2:50 Animal health is wealth. Robert Graham 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Answering questions from the question box. 
H. P. Rusk and others 



Farm Butchering, Cutting, and 
Curing of Meat 

(Meat Laboratory, Old Agriculture) 



Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Methods of cutting and canning beef and lamb. 
Sleeter Bull and Glenna Henderson 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Methods of cutting and curing pork. Sleeter 
Bull and Glenna Henderson 



Poultry Management 

(128 Nezv Agriculture) 



Monday 

1 : 00- 2:50 Demonstration — Judging fowls for egg pro- 
duction. H. J. Sloan (Stock Pavilion) 

1:00- 1:50 Demonstration — Sexing baby chicks. H. H. 
Alp (331 New Agr.) Note: A charge of 
$1.00 will be made to cover the cost of the 
10 chicks which each individual uses during 
the demonstration. Only 15 persons can be 
accommodated at one demonstration. If 
there is sufficient demand, the demonstration 
will be repeated at 2:00, 3:00, and 4:00. 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Disappointments in poultry breeding. L. E. 
Card 

10:00-10:50 Marketing Illinois eggs. H. H. Alp 

1:00- 1:50 Stopping the leaks in a poultry business. 
L. E. Card 

2:00- 2:50 Management plans for 1935. H. H. Alp 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Recent findings in poultry research. L. E. Card 

10:00-10 :50 The relation of hereditary resistance and 
susceptibility to the mortality problem. 
Elmer Roberts 

1:00- 1:50 The relation of general economic conditions 
to the poultry industry. L. J. Norton 



[20] 



2:00- 2:50 Adapting our farm poultry operations to 
changing conditions. II. L. Kempster, Pro- 
fessor of Poultry Husbandry, University 

of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 

Thursday 
9:00- 9:50 Feeding the laying flock. H. J. Sloan 
10:00-10:50 Housing farm poultry. H. L. KEMPSTER 
1:00- 1:50 Feeding young chicks. H. J. Sloan 
2:00- 2:50 Brooding and rearing chicks. L. E. Card 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Merchandising the turkey crop. T. L. Jones, 
Agricultural Agent, Chicago and Illinois 
Midland Railway, Havana 
Question box on turkey marketing. H. H. Alp 

10:00-10:50 Problems in turkey production. William 
Kohlmeyer, Poultry Extension Specialist, 
Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana 



Beekeeping 

(104 Experimental Zoology Laboratory — 

Comer Wright and Healey Streets, 

Champaign) 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 The working tools of the bees. B. W. Burks, 
Urbana 
Know your bees. V. G. Milum 

10:00-10:50 Types of hives and methods of assembling. 
V. G. Milum 

1:00- 1:50 The chemical composition of some Illinois 
honeys. G. E. Lynn, Rantoul 
Other characteristics of honey. V. G. Milum 
2:00- 2:50 Honey extracting demonstrations. V. G. Milum 

Wednesday 

8:00- 8:50 Do the bees vacation in winter? V. G. Milum 

9:00- 9:50 How shall we aid our bees in winter and 
spring? G. H. Cale, Editor, American Bee 
Journal, Hamilton, Illinois 
Bee hysteria. Carl E. Killion, Paris 

10:00-10:50 Colony management for extracting honey 
production. G. H. Cale 

1:00- 1:50 Producing comb honey. Carl E. Killion 
2:00- 2:50 Saving the beeswax. G. H. Cale 

Requeening — why, when, and how shall we 
do it? C. F. Earle, Dalton City 

Thursday 

8:00- 8:50 Races and strains of bees. G. H. Cale 

Saving time, steps, and worry in the apiary. 
E. F. Peterson, Secretary, Illinois State 
Beekeepers Association, Kewanee 



[21] 



9:00- 9:50 Adult bee diseases and pests. V. G. Milum 
Diagnosing brood disease. G. H. Cale 

10:00-10:50 Apiary inspection and methods of bee disease 
control. C. L. Duax, Chief Inspector of 
Apiaries, State Department of Agriculture, 
Chicago 

1:00- 1:50 Do we need beekeepers' associations? E. F. 
Peterson 

How shall we advertise our product? Wesley 
Osborne, Hillsboro 

2:00- 2:50 Preparing the crop for the market. C. L. Duax 
Grading and marketing our product. G. H. 
Cale 



DAIRY HUSBANDRY 



Dairy Cattle Feeding 

(127 Nezv Agriculture) 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Planning economical rations for dairy cows. 
W. B. Nevens 

Tuesday 

1:00- 1:50 Current problems in feeding dairy cattle: 
grain mixtures without oats ; feeding min- 
eral supplements; new feeds, including les- 
pedeza, brewers' and distillers' grains, etc. 
W. B. Nevens 



Producing High-Quality Milk 
and Cream 

(127 New Agriculture) 

Wednesday 

1:00- 1:50 Discussion and demonstration. Inexpensive 
methods of producing milk of high quality. 
M. J. Prucha 

Thursday 

1:00- 1:50 Discussion and demonstration. Methods of 
producing high-quality cream for butter- 
making; grading cream. M. J. Prucha 



Dairy Cattle Selection, Breeding, 
and Management 

(Stock Pavilion) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstrations and judging — Newer concep- 
tions of individuality in cattle. W. W. Yapp 
and A. F. Kuhlman 



[22] 



Wednesday 
9:00 -9:50 The calf club problem and need of club 

leadership. E. I. PlLCHARD 

10:00-10:50 Selection, care, and management of the Dairy 
Club calf. W. W. Yapp 
What the Dairy Calf Club has meant to me. 
M. F. DeMunn, and ECARL Kainz, former 
club champions and now students at the 
University of Illinois 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstration — Building a herd upon the 
scientific principles of breeding. W. W. 
Yapp and A. F. Kuhlman 

Friday 
9:00-9:50 The dairy farm as a unit. W. J. Fraser (205 
Old Agr.) 

10:00-10:50 The dairy farm enterprises with special refer- 
ence to the tenancy problem. H. C. M. Case 
(205 Old Agr.) 



Dairy Products 

(Dairy Manufactures) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Manufacture of soft cheeses. S. L. Tuckey 

1:00- 1:50 Common flavor defects in milk and cream. 
P. H. Tracy 

2:00- 2:50 Manufacture of special dairy products: choco- 
late milk, honey-cream, plastic cream, etc. 
P. H. Tracy 

Wednesday 

9:00^10:50 Manufacture of cheddar cheese. S. L. Tuckey 
1:00- 2:50 Manufacture of cheddar cheese. S. L. Tuckey 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Buttermaking. H. A. Ruehe 
1:00- 1:50 Butter judging. H. A. Ruehe 
2:00- 2:50 Cream whipping. P. H. Tracy 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Demonstration — Making ice cream, sherbets, 
ices, and fancy ice cream. P. H. Tracy 



Samples for the Butter and Cheese Contest should be 
left at the Dairy Manufactures Building not later than 
9 a.m., Tuesday, January 15, 1935. The prize awards will 
be announced at the General Session, Thursday morning. 



Testing Dairy Products 

(50 3 Old Agriculture) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Sampling and testing milk for fat by the 
Babcock test. Discussion and demonstration. 
O. R. Overman and O. F. Garrett 



123-] 



Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Sampling and testing cream by the Babcock 
test. Discussion and demonstration. O. R. 
Overman and O. F. Garrett 



HORTICULTURE 



Grape Production 

(326 Nezv Agriculture) 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 Adaptation of grape varieties to Illinois. A. S. 
Colby 

2:00- 2:50 Harvesting and storage of grapes. A. S. Colby 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Fruit bud studies of the grape in relation to 
fruitfulness. R. L. McMunn 

1:00- 2:50 Pruning and training young grapevines. A. S. 
Colby 

Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Planting the vineyard. R. S. Marsh 
10:00-10:50 Soil management of the vineyard. R. S. Marsh 
1:00- 2:50 Pruning fruiting grapevines. A. S. Colby 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Grape insects and their control. M. D. Farrar 

1:00- 2:50 Grape diseases and their control. H. W. An- 
derson 

Friday 

9:00-10:50 Questions on fruits and fruit production. 
Answered by staff. Bring in your questions 
at these hours on tree and small fruits. 



Flowers for the Home 

(118 New Agriculture) 

Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 Arrangement of cut flowers for the home. 
H. B. Dorner 

Wednesday 
9:00- 9:50 Roses for the home garden. S. W. Hall 

Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 Lawns and lawn grasses. F. F. Weinard 

Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Plants for the beginner's rock garden (Illus- 
trated.) J. H. Hanley 

[24] 



The Home Vegetable Garden 
(118 New Agriculture) 



Monday 

2:00- 2:50 Tomato culture in a hot, dry season. W. A. 
Huki.sk M 

Tuesday 

10:00-10:50 Commercial methods applicable to home can- 
ing. W. A. Huelsen 

2:00- 2:50 New and improved varieties of vegetables. B. 
L. Weaver 



Wednesday 

10:00-10:50 Dependable vegetables in unfavorable seasons. 
J. W. Lloyd 

2:00- 2:50 Relation of weather and other factors to the 
prevalence of vegetable diseases. K. J. 
Kadow 

Thursday 

10:00-10:50 The fall vegetable garden. B. L. Weaver 

2:00- 2:50 Irrigation systems applicable to Illinois gar- 
dens. L. A. Somers 

Friday 

10:00-10:50 Practical aspects of garden irrigation. L. A. 
Somers 



RURAL ORGANIZATION 



The Future of the AAA 

(103 New Agriculture) 
D. E. Lindstrom, presiding 



Tuesday 

00- 8:50 AAA discussion demonstrations. Edgar county 
team 

Wednesday 

:00- 8:50 AAA discussion demonstrations. McLean 
county team 

Thursday 

00- 8:50 AAA discussion demonstrations. Randolph 
county team 



Friday 

00- 8:50 AAA discussion demonstrations. Effingham 
county team. Selection of state team by 
Lyman Judson 



[25] 



Rural Rehabilitation 

(214 New Agriculture) 



Tuesday 

9:00- 9:50 National objectives in rural rehabilitation. 
W. A. Westbrook, Director of Rural Reha- 
bilitation, F. E. R. A., Washington, D. C. 



Wednesday 

9:00- 9:50 Basic considerations for a rural rehabilitation 
program in Illinois. C. H. Humphrey, Di- 
rector, Rural Rehabilitation, I. E. R. C, 
Chicago 



Thursday 

9:00- 9:50 State objectives in rural rehabilitation. C. H. 
Humphrey 



Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Progress made on rural rehabilitation in Illi- 
nois. C. H. Humphrey 



Rural Ministers and Lay 
Workers' Forum 

(214 New Agriculture) 
R. E. Hieronymus, presiding 



Monday 

1:00- 1:50 The rural community and the council of 
churches. Reverend Charles Shike, Exe- 
cutive Secretary, Illinois Council of 
Churches, Springfield 

2:00- 2:50 Rural rehabilitation and the rural church. 
James H. Dance, Regional Rural Rehabil- 
itation Adviser, Chicago 

6:00 Dinner — Various separate denominational groups 
about the campus 



Tuesday 

1:00-2:50 Panel discussion. The new impact of vital 
religion on the changing rural order. Rev- 
erend H. Clifford Northcott, leader, Mrs. 
Homer Johnson, J. H. Singleton, George 
Iftner, George Nell, Clara Brian, William 
Riegel, Frank Breen, Charles Shike 

6:00 Joint dinner for rural ministers and lay leaders 
[26] 



4-H CLUB WORK 



Working With Young People 
(Gregorian Hall, Third Floor, Woman's Building) 

Monday 

1:00- 1:50 The 4-H leader's place in a creative program. 
Lynn Rohrbough, Director, Church Rec- 
reation League of Ohio, Delaware, Ohio 

Tuesday 

1:00- 1:50 Another leaf for the 4-H clover. Lynn 
Rohrbough 

Wednesday 

1:00- 1:50 An economic foundation for good recreation. 
Lynn Rohrbough 

Thursday 

1:00- 1:50 Three popular projects for local 4-H clubs. 
Lynn Rohrbough 



FARM FORESTRY 

(316 New Agriculture) 



Wednesday 
1:00- 2:50 The use of trees for gully control. L. E. 
Sawyer 

Thursday 

1:00- 2:50 Management and protection of woodlands; 
utilization and marketing of woodland prod- 
ucts. (Illustrated by film strips) L. E. Sawyer 



HOME ECONOMICS 



A Panorama of Homemaking Problems 

(First Floor, South Parlor, Woman's Building) 

Monday 
1:00- 1:50 When you buy textiles. Mary C. Whitlock 

2:00- 2:50 Hygiene and health on the farm. F. W. 
Tanner 

Tuesday 
9:00- 9:50 The child's own library. Agnes F. P. Greer 
Books for grown-ups. Anna May Price, 
Library Extension Division, Springfield • 

10:00-10:50 New views of familiar foods. Stella Munger 

1:00- 1:50 Measures of growth and nutrition. Julia 
Outhouse 

2:00- 2:50 Keynotes in costumes. Helen Eades and 
Mary W. Beam 



[27] 



Friday 

9:00- 9:50 Factors affecting family life today. B. F. 
Timmons 

10:00-10:50 The University and the home. Ruth A. 
Wardall 



Homemakers Conference 

(Lincoln Hall Theatre) 

Tuesday 

9:00-10:50 Conference of home bureau officers and 
leaders. (Second Floor Parlors, IV. B.) 
Factors contributing to the county home 
bureau organization: 

(a) An informed membership. Mrs. Louis 

Weyrich, Tazewell county 

(b) The home adviser's part in correlating 

program activities. Fern Carl, Rock 
Island County Home Adviser 

(c) The part of a county membership com- 

mittee. Mrs. Charles Brownsey, Liv- 
ingston county 
Results of district organization schools and 
future plans. Mrs. Elsie Mies, Chairman, 
Federation Organization Committee 

1:30 p.m. Business session, Illinois Federation of Home 
Bureaus. Mrs. Leonard Killey, President, 
presiding 

Wednesday 

9:00-10:50 Group singing led by Mary McKee 

Roll call by counties and short reports 
Pending legislation regarding insurance. F. 
G. Dickinson 

1:00 p.m. Group singing 

Creative leisure. Mrs. Spencer Ewing, 

Bloomington 
Art in American gardens. Mrs. M. L. Fuller, 
Landscape Artist, Peoria 

4:15 p.m. Economical and artistic use of cottons. 
(Dresses shown on living models). Cather- 
ine Eloise Cleveland, Cotton Textile Insti- 
tute, New York 

Thursday 

9:00-10:50 Group singing 

Personality and clothes. Mrs. Evelyn Tobey, 
The Fashion Service, New York 

1:00- 2:50 Group singing 

Who pays for advertising? F. A. Russell 
Individuality in clothing. Mrs. Evelyn Tobey 



[28] 



Special Conferences 



Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association 

The Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association will 
hold their annual winter meeting Tuesday, January 15, 
at 10 a.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 

The annual meeting of the Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 
will be held Wednesday, January 16, at 10 a.m., in Room 
205 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Guernsey Breeders Association 

The annual winter meeting of the Illinois Guernsey 
Breeders Association will be held Thursday, January 17, 
at 10 a.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association 

The annual business meeting of the Illinois Crop Im- 
provement Association will be held Wednesday, January 
16, at 4 p.m., in Room 205 Old Agriculture. 

The annual banquet of the Illinois Crop Improvement 
Association will be held in the Lower Gymnasium, 
Woman's Building, Wednesday, January 16, 5:30 to 7:45 
p.m. An interesting special feature in addition to a short 
program will follow the dinner. Medals will be awarded 
to winners in the Ten-Acre Corn-Growing Contest as well 
as in the Utility Corn Show. Everyone attending Farm 
and Home Week is invited to attend. 



Illinois Turkey Growers' Association 

The Illinois Turkey Growers' Association w T ill hold an 
all-day meeting at Urbana on Friday, January 18. In the 
morning they will meet at 128 Nezu Agriculture and in 
the afternoon at the Stock Pavilion. During the after- 
noon, Mr. T. W. Heitz, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
will give a demonstration of up-to-date methods in killing 
and dressing turkeys for market, and will discuss the 
government grading program as it relates to turkey 
marketing. 

Annual School for Grain Judges 

(110 Old Agriculture) 

During Farm and Home Week the Department of 
Agronomy and the Illinois Crop Improvement Association 
conducts a school for seed and grain judges. At the con- 
clusion of the school an examination is held and certifi- 
cates of "Certified Grain Judge" awarded to those who 
successfully complete the week's work and pass the ex- 
amination. Scheduled work will be given from 8 to 9 a.m. 
and 4 to 6 p.m. with an opportunity for individual practice 
during the day. The first meeting will be held Monday, 
January 14, at 11 a.m. in 110 Old Agriculture Building. 
Special emphasis will be given to legumes and grass seeds 
this year. 



[29] 



Illinois Seed Grain Show 

{Fourth Floor, Nezv Agriculture) 

The Illinois Seed Grain Show and the Fifteenth An- 
nual Utility Corn Show will be held in connection with 
Farm and Home Week. 

The Corn Show will be open to visitors at 4 p.m. Mon- 
day, January 14, and will remain open thruout the week. 
The best hours to visit the show are 8:00 a.m. and from 
4 to 6 p.m. daily. 

Illinois Guild of Master Farm Homemakers 

The annual business meeting of the Illinois Guild of 
Master Farm Homemakers will be held Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 16, at 4 p.m. in the Woman's Building. There will be 
a luncheon Thursday, January 17, at 12 m. at the Southern 
Tea Room. 



ART EXTENSION COMMITTEE 
CONFERENCE 



Wednesday 

1:00- 2:50 Creative leisure. Mrs. Spencer Ewing, 
Bloomington 
Art in American gardens. Mrs. M. L. Fuller, 
Landscape Artist, Peoria {Little Theatre, 
Lincoln Hall) 

3:00- 3:30 Address. President Arthur C. Willard, Uni- 
versity of Illinois {Auditorium) 

4:00 p.m. Orchestra concert. F. B. Stiven, Director 
{Smith Memorial Hall) 

4:30 p.m. Reception {Woman's Building) 

6:00 p.m. Supper. Cafeteria Service {Woman's Build- 
ing Cafeteria) 

7:30 p.m. Winter festival. {Nezv Gymnasium) 

Thursday 
With Community Planning Conference 

{Hall of Casts, Architecture Building) 

9:00- 9:50 How to organize a citizen's agency for com- 
munity betterment. Frank Lawrence, Di- 
rector, Civic Bureau, St. Louis Chamber of 
Commerce 

10:00-10:50 Objectives in national planning and the citi- 
zen's interest. Miss Harlean James, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the American Civil As- 
sociation 

11:00-11:50 An official city planning act for Illinois. Har- 
land Bartholomew, Nonresident professor 
of civic design 
Discussion 

2:00- 2:50 Coordination between local community plan- 
ning and the larger regional plans. B. C. 
McCurdy, Engineer, St. Clair county 

3:00- 3:50 County planning as a part of the picture. A. 
C. Gauen, President, Tri-County Regional 
Planning Federation 



[30] 



4:00 p. m. The development of a typical community 
planning venture. (Illustrated). Karl B. 
Lohmann, 

Discussion and Summary. REXFOKD Nkwcomb 

Friday 

(Little Theatre, Lincoln I fall) 

9:00- 9:50 Panel discussion. The interrelated arts. C. E. 
Palmer, leader; and C. E. Bradbury, J. S. 
Crandell, Harlean James, F. B. Stiven, 
George L. Clark, Maria Leonard, Fannie 
Brooks, Otto G. Schaffer, and E. T. 
Hiller 



Music and Drama Tournament Finals 

Tuesday 

10:00 a.m. Rehearsal for state chorus. (Smith Memorial 
Hall) 

8:15 p.m. Mid-year recital of the Illinois counties' rural 
chorus. (Auditorium) 

Thursday 

10:00 a.m. Annual business meeting for delegates of the 
Illinois music and drama tournament. (214 
New Agr.) 

4:00 p.m. The fifth annual music tournament. (Smith 
Memorial Hall) 

5:00 p.m. Rehearsal of quartet ensembles. (Basement 
of Smith Memorial Hall) 

6:00 p.m. Annual dinner for participants in the music 
and drama tournament. (Cafeteria, Woman's 
Building) 

7:30 p.m. Sixth annual drama tournament and music 
festival. (Auditorium) 



ILLINOIS SOCIETY OF FARM 
MANAGERS 

(Auditorium) 



Thursday 

C. L. Stewart, presiding 

9:00- 9:50 Regional aspects of Illinois land-use problems. 
L. R. Schoenmann, Regional Director, 
Land Policy Section, AAA, Urbana 
Replanning Illinois land uses for crop and 
livestock production. R. R. Hudelson 

10:00-10:50 Replanning Illinois land for forest and wood- 
lot production. L. E. Sawyer 

Replanning Illinois land uses for recreation 
and game production. W. F. Lodge, Presi- 
dent, Illinois Division, Izaak Walton League 
of America, Inc. 

Round table discussion. 



[31] 



11:00-11:50 The outlook for planned land use. L. C. Gray, 
Chief Land Policy Section, AAA, Washing- 
ton, D.C 
Joseph Ackerman, presiding 

12:00 m. Lunch. Bradley Arcade 

1:15 p.m. Progress report of soil erosion demonstra- 
tion, F. A. Fisher, Director, Soil Erosion 
Service, U. S. D. I. (Bradley Arcade) 

1:45 p.m. Election of officers 

2:30 p.m. Some problems relating to a continuing agri- 
cultural adjustment program. F. F. Elliott, 
Assistant Chief, Planning Division, AAA 
(Bradley Arcade) 

3:30 p.m. Discussion. P. E. Johnston, W. E. Reigel, 
Tolono, W. W. McLaughlin, Director, Illi- 
nois State Department of Agriculture, 
Springfield, and D. Howard Doane, Doane 
Agricultural Service, St. Louis, Missouri 
(Bradley Arcade) 

6:00 p.m. Dinner. Bradley Arcade 

7:15 p.m. Agricultural planning in relation to farm man- 
agement. Round table discussion, H. C. M. 
Case, leader; L. C. Gray, F. F. Elliott, 
and W. W. McLaughlin (Bradley Arcade) 



[32] 



Exhibits 



Exhibits for the Farm and Home 

(Second Floor Gymnasium, Woman's Building) 

I. Farm food products and their use 
Poultry 

Experimental chicks showing the results of proper 
and improper feeding. Baby chicks. 

Vegetables 
Display of Chinese cabbage. Suggestive uses. Instruc- 
tions for cultivation. Methods of storage. 

Meats 
Preservation of meats in various stages of cure. Helps 
in making lard. Display of meat in various methods 
of preservation. 

Honey 
Care and use of honey. Extracting process demon- 
strated. Foods showing use of honey. Mimeo- 
graphed material on uses. 

Dairy products 
Helps in making butter and cheese. Display showing 
proper and improper methods. Equipment for 
making dairy products. 

Ways of using Illinois farm products 
Soybeans — various methods of using the soybean for 
human consumption. Flour from Illinois grains. 
Illinois fruits preserved and jellied. 

Nutrition and dietetics 
Foods as related to health showing mineral content 
of specific foods. Physical growth of the child. 

II. Household operation 

Household repairs 
Proper care and use of household equipment. Answers 
to questions on how to repair home equipment. 

Cutlery 
A display of household knives, shears, and sharpeners. 
A display of knives for dressing poultry. Points 
to look for in buying knives. 

Farm and home accounts 
Showing how farm and home records may be kept. 
Summary material showing the value of account 
keeping. 

Sezving room 
Showing equipment and convenient arrangement of 
a sewing unit in the home. 

Child's room 

Furniture and equipment for a child's room. Possi- 
bilities of homemade equipment. 

Household pests 
Display of methods of eradication and control of 
clothes moths and carpet beetles. 



IMl 




3 0112 105729443 

III. Textiles and clothing 

1. Early American textiles 

Coverlets and shawls, old and new, showing adapta- 
tions of old patterns. 

2. Tale of a shirt 

Materials in men's shirts, good and poor quality. 
Points to consider when buying. 

3. Bath towels 

How to determine a good towel. Illustrations of good 
and poor towels. 

4. Children's dresses 

An exhibit of made-over garments for children, pre- 
pared and loaned by the Bureau of Home Eco- 
nomics, Washington, D. C. 

IV. Table setting 

A display of tables showing costs, suitability to occasion 
and harmony in choice of dishes, linen and silver. 
This project will be executed by three Home Eco- 
nomics student organizations. 

V. Floriculture 

A display of potted and cut flowers suitable for home use. 
Glass gardens. 

VI. Book exhibit 

Books for the homemaker's library concerning food, cloth- 
ing, management and child care. Books for children. 



Agricultural Engineering 

In addition to the power and field machinery, home 
equipment, and building materials ordinarily displayed in 
the Agricultural Engineering Building, there will be special 
exhibits of soil erosion machinery. Other features will 
be (1) haying machinery and combine balers, (2) tractor 
with Diesel engine, (3) tractors with low pressure tires, 
(4) farmbuilding plans and models. Moving pictures will 
be shown in the building each day during the noon hour, 
and students will operate a lunch stand. 



Agronomy 

The fourth floor of the New Agricultural Building will 
be open from 8 a. m. to 6 p. m. daily. Among the exhibits 
pertaining to soils and crops are the following: State 
Corn Show, acre-yield exhibit, certified seed exhibit, les- 
pedeza exhibit, chinch bug control, chinch-bug-resistant 
varieties of corn, barberry eradication, soil erosion control, 
getting the most out of roughage, the drouth of 1934 and 
what it did to crops, and the general agricultural exhibit. 
Take the elevator at the north end of the first floor, New 
Agricultural Building. 



Animal Husbandry 

A pathological museum of animal diseases may be seen 
in the Animal Pathology Building, 8 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily. 
The purebred and experimental herds and flocks main- 
tained on the Animal Husbandry farm may be seen by 
Farm and Home Week visitors at the same hours. 



[34] 



Bulletin Exhibit 

Bulletins and circulars of the College of Agriculture 
arc on exhibit in the Auditorium. With this arc forms on 
which visitors may apply for the bulletins and circulars 
they desire. Names may he put on the bulletin mailing list 
thru this channel. I >ast year many visitors took advantage 
o\ this information and a total of 11,112 publications were 
distributed. 

Dairy Products Exhibit 

(Second Floor Gymnasium, Woman's Building) 

To assist farmers of Illinois in securing more profitable 
outlets for milk and cream, the Division of Dairy Manu- 
facturers is arranging an exhibit that will show the best 
methods of preparing certain dairy products for market. 
Methods of manufacture and suggestions for packages and 
containers will be made. The more common defects 
occurring in butter and cheese will be illustrated and rem- 
edies will.be suggested. This exhibit should be of interest 
to the farm-dairy operator as well as to the farm wife. 

Horticulture 

In the Vegetable Greenhouses will be found a crop of 
tomatoes and other vegetables grown under glass during 
the winter months. 

A wide variety of foliage and flowering plants, includ- 
ing roses, carnations, snapdragons, ferns, palms, and many 
other ornamentals will be on display at the Floricultural 
Greenhouses. 

An exhibit of nuts and a display of horticultural litera- 
ture will be found in the lobby of the Horticultural Field 
Laboratory. 

These buildings will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 

Museums 

I. Classical Archaeology and Art, European Culture, 
Oriental Museum — Top floor Lincoln Hall, open from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m. daily, elevator service. These museums 
consist of collections of originals and reproductions of 
works of art, coins, arms and armour, peasant costumes, 
theatre models, ship models, wood and ivory carvings, 
early musical instruments, pottery, mummy case fragments 
and mummified sacred birds from Egypt, objects from 
Palestine, models of domestic furniture and pre-historic 
implements from the Near East, and a special exhibit of 
Balinese handicraft and weaving. 

II. Natural History Museum — Third floor Natural His- 
tory Building, open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Exhibits 
of special interest are: Group showing injurious apple 
insects; group showing injurious corn insects; consumers 
products made from corn ; consumers products made from 
cotton and cocoa ; how buttons are made ; pearls and their 
culture ; clothing and food of the Esquimaux ; clothing 
of the Australians ; birds economically useful to the farmer 
and their food habits ; the history of the horse ; and 
ancient man and his descendants. In addition there can 
be seen a large collection and exhibit of Indian culture and 
animal and geological life. 

Exhibition of Work by Modern 
American Painters 

Original oil paintings by renowned living artists, loaned 
by one of the large New York galleries, are on display in 
the east gallery of the Architecture Building. 

[35] 



Portrait of Dean Davenport 

The portrait of Dean emeritus Eugene Davenport, 
painted by Sidney E. Dickinson, N. A., is on display on 
the second floor (south end) of the New Agricultural 
Building. The funds for the painting of the portrait were 
subscribed by former students, present and former mem- 
bers of the faculty of the College of Agriculture, col- 
leagues in other institutions, personal friends and asso- 
ciates, and numerous Illinois citizens. The portrait was 
presented to the University of Illinois in June, 1932, and 
placed in its present position during the past year. 



[36]